Category Archives: Job Demand in Malaysia

Top 10 Degree Programmes to Study in Malaysia after UEC 考试 that has Future High Job Demand & Salary

Ten Degree Fields of Study with Most In-Demand Job & High Salaries for UEC 考试Graduates to Consider

If you have completed your UEC then chances are that you are worried about what to study at university. Maybe your friends have it all figured out. They have chosen a course early on.

But what if you have no idea which degree to study at university?

You’re not alone. Choosing a a degree course is a major decision, and one you shouldn’t take lightly. This is potentially a life-changing decision. There are many things to consider when choosing a degree course.

With hundreds of degree programmes to choose from at private universities in Malaysia, students may find the process of picking the right course overwhelming. It’s also easy to worry if you don’t know what to major in. After all, the course that you choose will likely determine your future career.

If you’re struggling to decide which degree you should study at university, perhaps it might help to learn more about which degree subjects will be the most beneficial to you after you graduate.

Read on for helpful advice on The 10 best fields of study for undecided students after UEC.

Please fill up the Form below and I will WhatsApp you and provide you with sound advise on how to choose the best private university or college in Malaysia to study at. If you do not give your mobile number or full name as in IC, your query will not be answered. Our knowledgeable & experienced counsellor will send you a message on WhatsApp & provide assistance from there.

A List of the Top 10 Best Degree Courses to Study in Malaysia for UEC Graduates

EduSpiral helped me to understand clearly what software engineering is about & helped me to choose the right university. Vincent Chow, Software Engineering Graduate, Asia Pacific University
EduSpiral helped me to understand clearly what software engineering is about & helped me to choose the right university. Vincent Chow, Software Engineering Graduate, Asia Pacific University

As the digital economy grows, Malaysia must be prepared to choose jobs that will be in demand in the future as well as still exist. 75 million job roles are expected to disappear by 2022 according to the “Future of Jobs Report 2018” by the World Economic Forum.

Furthermore, another 133 million roles are expected to emerge. The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0), artificial intelligence (AI), innovation, automation, Internet of Things (IOT) and other technological advancement would impact all industries. The Industry 4.0 will change the kinds of jobs needed across all market sectors.

Between 3.3 million and 6 million jobs are expected to be created in Malaysia by 2030, but with the new age of automation Industrial 4.0, preparation and training are fast becoming the critical factor as the new workforce would need new skills.

The world is changing and changing fast, but what does that mean for your education and career? Find out which jobs are growing and what degrees those jobs need. Below is the list of the top courses with future high job demand and salary in Malaysia.

  1. Computing & Technology Courses
  2. Accounting & Financial Services Courses
  3. Business Courses
  4. Engineering Courses
  5. Law
  6. Communication & Social Science Courses
  7. Built Environment Courses
  8. Hospitality & Tourism Courses
  9. Design Courses
  10. Health Science Courses

What are the Top 10 Degree Courses to Study for Students after UEC?

EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary. Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate from UCSI University
EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary.
Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate

With the evolution of technology, the current job landscape in Malaysia has changed drastically. In many industries and countries, the current in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even five years ago. The rise of technology has led to a disruption in the way we work and live. The Digital Era of the Industrial Revolution INR 4.0 has changed the way we work and live. Therefore, the course that you choose need to prepare you for the future job that’s filled with technological advancements.

What are you going to study? What career do you want? Which education path are you going to follow to get there? These are the life-changing questions that need well thought out answers after your secondary school. While high school and university education is about more than just career preparation, what are the necessary skills that will help you to find and keep a job in the future?

UEC graduates who explore, research and plan their potential future lives in work are much better placed to make decisions that are right for them and compete for available jobs when they graduate.

An experienced Education Advisor would be invaluable in assisting you to choose the right course. Students need to talk to the right education counselors so that you get the right information to help you in making this life-changing decision.. The best courses to study are those that have a future high job demand and salary, as well as, suited to your academic knowledge and skills.

1. Computing & Technology Courses

Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)
I was confused about what to study & at which university. Talking to EduSpiral helped clear my doubts.
Zen Yi, Graduated from Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)

The National Policy on Industry Revolution 4.0 (Industry4WRD), spearheaded by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), will play a vital role in promoting digitalisation across all sectors. Businesses are starting to pivot their operations to enable remote capabilities, no longer restricted to borders and time zone differences.

The Information and Technology (IT) industry continues to relish tremendous growth since the pandemic started. It is one of the fastest growing sectors in the Malaysian market to date. According to a report by GlobalData Market Opportunities Forecasts, IT expenditure in Malaysia will reach RM103.75 billion by 2023.

Many of the fastest growing jobs and predicted future ones are driven by technology development, increased Internet connectivity, rapid globalisation and new business demands. Tech skills are required in jobs across industries in different roles and functions and this is expected to create demand for tech-based or tech-related jobs.

Jobs like artificial intelligence specialists and data scientists are required across industries to help organisations and businesses be more efficient in delivering their products and services, and be more responsive to customer demands in anticipated increased competition.

Cybersecurity and data systems integration solutions are burgeoning. The essentialities of such services received acknowledgement by SMEs, and the adoption rate reflects the shift. And predictably, the top 10% of job opportunities in Malaysia are cybersecurity related.

Budget 2021 allocated RM27million for cybersecurity programs alone. That itself forms the fundamental building blocks of the digital transition under the Malaysian Digital Economy roadmap. Although data systems integration (internet of things, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, big data analytics) and cybersecurity remains one of the greater potentials, the government is looking into creating 5G ecosystems.

In 2020, Malaysia recorded a shortage of 7,917 experts within the field. This is consistent with global trends, where the speed of digitalisation greatly outpaces the number of skilled talent. The government aims to resolve this shortage with plans of producing 20,000 cybersecurity knowledge workers by 2025 through the MyDIGITAL blueprint.

In February 2021, the government launched its digital blueprint—MyDIGITAL, a roadmap that charts the path towards Malaysia’s vision of becoming a regional leader in the digital economy. Some of these initiatives include increasing the number of local data centres to provide high-end cloud computing services, rolling out 5G networks, and driving greater cybersecurity adoption. MyDIGITAL is expected to create 500,000 new job opportunities in the digital economy and, in effect, contribute 22.6% of Malaysia’s gross domestic product by 2030.

  1. Cyber Security
  2. Data Science or Data Analytics
  3. Artificial Intelligence (Ai) or Intelligent Systems
  4. Robotics
  5. Cloud Computing
  6. Internet of Things (IoT)
  7. Computer Science
  8. Software Engineering or Programming
  9. Information Technology (IT) or Information Communications Technology
  10. Mobile Computing
  11. Network Computing
  12. Games Development

2. Accounting & Financial Services Courses

"I was confused and had some questions. EduSpiral met up with me and my mum to explain more about the course and helped me choose the right course."
“I was confused and had some questions. EduSpiral met up with me and my mum to explain more about the course and helped me choose the right course.”
Gary, Accounting Graduate from University of Wollongong Malaysia (UOWM) KDU

An important industry for the country, it contributes up to 11 percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).There are many areas in the banking and finance sector in Malaysia where each sub-sector requiring specific knowledge and skills.In today’s ever-changing world, banking and finance graduates are highly sought-after in a cross-section of Malaysia’s industries where each offer a variety of job opportunities.  The Financial sector stands as one of the largest sectors in Malaysia with more than 300,000 people employed. This sector is made up by professionals in the AccountingBankingEconomicsFinanceInsurance and Statistics and Taxation sub-sectors.

As Malaysia’s economy progressively opens up and stabilises from the pandemic, roles within the Banking & Financial sector are rapidly evolving to keep pace with market and growth needs. Bank Negara, Malaysia’s central bank is set to issue its first digital banking licences in Q3 to Q4 2022, a move which is projected to accelerate the mushrooming of Fintech companies in the country.

Accordingly, demand for talent with cross-functional skill sets across finance and tech will rise rapidly as hiring activities increase. The ideal candidate would have experience in the audit, risk, or investment space as well as skills in data analytics and automation.

At the same time, there is also a growing awareness, especially among younger Malaysians, of tech-enabled financial tools such as digital wealth management platforms. As these tools and platforms become more prevalent, banks and financial institutions are progressively moving away from selling structured
products.

Fintech is another area that continues to experience significant growth due to changing consumer behaviour, movement control restrictions, and regulatory changes. According to the Fintech Malaysia Report 2021, online and mobile banking penetration reached 112.5% and 61.8% respectively, with more than 3 million new mobile banking service subscribers and 400,000 new businesses registering for QR code payment acceptance in 2020.

The key in succeeding in the banking & finance industry is choosing the right specialisation, and ensuring you find a career path that best match your abilities and interests. Therefore, having a finance qualification can lead to a rewarding career. A fast-track career in finance depends on a good understanding of market movements and the diverse investment market.

  1. Accounting
  2. Accounting & Finance
  3. Actuarial Science
  4. Banking & Finance
  5. Finance
  6. Financial Technology (Fintech)

3. Business Courses

EduSpiral helped me to transfer my business diploma into UCSI University. He had advised me to go for a university with an English-speaking environment so that I can improve myself. Kwang Wei, Business graduate from UCSI University
EduSpiral helped me to transfer my business diploma into UCSI University. He had advised me to go for a university with an English-speaking environment so that I can improve myself.
Kwang Wei, Business graduate

As of Q2 2021, Malaysia’s e-commerce income grew 23.3% year-on-year, driven by the manufacturing and services sector. Total gross salaries paid within this sector also increased by 0.4%, equivalent to RM100.5 million.

E-commerce is seen as one of the bright spots driving Malaysia’s economic recovery, not just for its growing popularity but also for its growth potential. Many brick and-mortar stores were able to continue their businesses throughout the lockdowns by taking them online. And with platforms like eBay, even micro, small, and medium businesses have a platform to compete in global markets.

The e-commerce space is revelling positive growth amidst the pandemic. Retail sectors are occupying the e-commerce space while platforms such as Lazada and Shopee are booming. The government understands the merits of e-commerce enterprises. Thus, implementing various initiatives to strengthen Malaysia’s digital economy.

In addition, there is an allotment of RM300 million for the existing Penjana Micro & SMEs eCommerce, Penjana Shop Malaysia Online, Selangor e-Bazar and Buy Malaysia initiatives by the government encouraging consumers to shop online. As a result, more than 500,000 local SMEs will procure benefits from them.

As of 2020, 83% of the Malaysian population uses the internet, with ​​70% of them frequenting social networking apps, and 61% on shopping apps. Digital marketing has become crucial for brands to reach these prospective customers, thus making roles under this industry highly demanded.

The roles under this umbrella consist of digital marketing specialists who are responsible for creating marketing campaigns and reporting results. Companies are also seeking out content creators for marketing purposes, whether it’s a writer or editor for written content, or a video producer or graphic design artist for visual content. And to ensure content is able to reach audiences, they need to be optimised for search engines like Google. This makes specialists in search engine optimisation (SEO) in demand.

A course that many students overlook is Human Resource Management. Human Resource professionals whose expertise lie in learning and development, talent management, change management and transformation are an extremely sought-after breed, and especially so if such talent possess digital adoption or digital project management experience to boot.

The heightened need for greater tech-savvy HR professionals is accelerated by initiatives such as the Malaysian government’s announcement to pump US$720 million into its “Industry Digitalization Transformation Fund”, in its endeavours to enhance its digital economy. A significant US$50 million of which would be used to help small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in their transition to Industry 4.0.

HR leaders who “lean into” new technologies, platforms, and ways of workin will be strongly positioned to have an impact on business results and employee experience. The importance of the HR function to digitalise the modus operandi of businesses has never been more indisputable.

  1. Digital Marketing
  2. Marketing
  3. eBusiness
  4. Human Resource Management (HRM)
  5. Logistics Management
  6. Supply Chain Management,

4. Engineering Courses

I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream. Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor's University
I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream.
Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor’s University

In order for the country to become a developed nation, the engineer to population ratio must be 1:100. For Malaysia, with a population of 32 million, the number of engineers should be 300,000. Surprisingly, based on the Education Ministry’s statistics from 1997 to 2020, the average number of engineers produced per year by the local institutions of higher learning, excluding graduates from international universities is about 16,000.

The cumulative total of all engineers produced from 1997 to 2020 is estimated to be about 400,000. The number of engineers may be currently surplus for Malaysia.The world will always need engineers, but some specialized fields are growing faster than others.

As the population ages, environmental policy changes, and automation takes over more and more aspects of manufacturing, the world needs qualified and experienced engineers to design, develop, test, and implement new strategies to meet the challenges of technological advancements.

Unfortunately, the reality is that only 35% of the graduate engineers (GE) registered with the Board of Engineers Malaysia (BEM). BEM is owned by the Malaysian government to administer the registration of PE. Although according to Malaysia’s law through the Registration of Engineers Act 1967 (Revised 2015), all practising engineers must be registered with the BEM as GE to work as an engineer legally. According to the statistic published by BEM in February 2020, only 10% out of 142,000 registered Graduate Engineer (GE) successfully obtained the certification as Professional Engineer, which is less than 4% of all engineers in Malaysia.

The surge in telecommunications and internet usage skyrocketed. Virtual meetings are the norm. Software such as Zoom and other communication platforms are now necessities. Wireless networks and fibre broadband are a must to keep operations and businesses running amidst this pandemic.

Ministry of Finance states that the Malaysian economy expects to rebound between 6.0% and 7.5% through its gross domestic product in 2021. And civil engineering will be the one spurring the recovery.

  1. Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  2. Mechanical Engineering
  3. Mechatronic Engineering
  4. Telecommunications Engineering
  5. Civil Engineering
  6. Petroleum Engineering
  7. Chemical Engineering

5. Law

Although lawyers affect nearly every aspect of society in a range of positions and industries, their basic duties are the same–to represent the needs of their clients in civil and criminal trials. Lawyers can specialize in bankruptcy, international, elder, probate, or environmental law. The growing field of intellectual property is also seeing a growing level of attention from lawyers. There are 14,300 registered lawyers in Malaysia.

  1. Law

6. Communication & Social Science Courses

Mass Communication Graduate from KDU University College
EduSpiral talked to me to find out my interests and career goals. He also took me to a few universities to tour the campuses to see which one fit me best.
Jia Ping, Mass Communication Graduate from UOWM KDU University College

Existing jobs like content creators are now being taken to the next level and being given new dimensions by technology to reach a wider audience through multiple channels and platforms. Bloggers, podcasters, and YouTubers are in demand as companies look to create both tactical and strategic content that will help their customers make sense of the new and rapidly changing environment.As of 2020, 83% of the Malaysian population uses the internet, with ​​70% of them frequenting social networking apps, and 61% on shopping apps. Data from LinkedIn shows an astounding increase of 48% for more digital marketers and content creators. Digital marketing has become crucial for brands to reach these prospective customers, thus making roles under this industry highly demanded.

The roles under this umbrella consist of digital marketing specialists who are responsible for creating marketing campaigns and reporting results. Companies are also seeking out content creators for marketing purposes, whether it’s a writer or editor for written content, or a video producer or graphic design artist for visual content.

  1. Mass Communication
  2. Public Relations, Advertising & Brand Management
  3. Film, TV, Video or Broadcasting
  4. Psychology

7. Built Environment Courses

As the East Coal Rail Line aims for completion in 2027, others projects continue to boost Malaysia’s construction sector. These include the Mass Rail Transit 2, Light Rail Transit 3, Electrified Double Track Gemas-Johor Bahru, Klang Valley Double Track Phase 2, Pan Borneo Highway and Coastal Highway.The 5-year centralised economic development plan, known as the Malaysia Plan, will be one of the keys to driving the construction sector up to pace again. The government has plans to expand and modernise the public infrastructures within the country. In December 2020, the government approved a 2021 budget worth RM322.5 billion (US$73.3 billion). 73.3% for operational expenditure, 21.4% towards development expenditure and the balance of 5.3% to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic.

With projects underway, there is a surge in demand for skilled labour workers within the property and construction industry.

  1. Architecture
  2. Interior Architecture
  3. Quantity Survey (QS)

8. Hospitality & Tourism Courses

I didn't know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose. Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism
I didn’t know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose.
Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism

While in Malaysia, in the same year, the Department of Statistics revealed that employment in the tourism industry grew by 4.9 percent (3.5 million people), contributing to 23.5 percent of total employment. These statistics provide a clear indication that the tourism industry holds promising prospects for those who intend to venture into this career path.Over six decades, global tourism has experienced steady growth and has been seen as a powerful vehicle for economic benefit and job creation. In 2018, the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) reported that the tourism industry is one of the world’s largest economic sectors contributing 10.4 percent of the world’s gross domestic product (GDP) and creating more than 319 million jobs globally.

As long as there is interest to explore places, be it physically or virtually, the promise of securing a job in this sector will always be available. Traditional and current, tourism career options range from working in hotels or resorts, cruise ships, adventure sports centers or even as tour guides leading activities and historical trips.

However, with the advancement in new technologies, tourism-related businesses need to transform the way they operate in order to utilize and adapt to the new emerging opportunities in the current Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR 4.0). Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Blockchain, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality are among the emerging buzzwords in Tourism 4.0. These technologies help to unlock innovation and new potential in the tourism sector. With available data online, more personalized experiences will be created. This will create new markets for future tourism career growth. Online travel agents, tourism influencer marketers and niche tourism are among the disruptors that are expected to cater the demand of future tourism job vacancies.

On the other hand, without doubt the COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected this industry. Many tourism services have had to close down, revenue from the tourism sector decreased and tourism operators were forced to find other alternatives to stay afloat. However, one should not be discouraged as it has been proven in the past, this industry has persevered and rebounded, and undoubtedly will be able to rebuild stronger than ever.

  1. Culinary Arts
  2. Baking or Patisserie 
  3. Events Management
  4. Hotel Management

9. Design Courses

I didn't come from a rich family but I very much wanted to go to KL to study. EduSpiral helped me to find a good university with affordable fees. Eric Lau, Graduated from Graphic Design at First City University College
I didn’t come from a rich family but I very much wanted to go to KL to study. EduSpiral helped me to find a good university with affordable fees.
Eric Lau, Graduated from Graphic Design at First City University College

Many companies are tailoring advertising work to digital and direct mail in the hopes of reaching all the online shoppers at home. As companies battle to maintain brand dominance, creative firms and in-house departments are taking on additional projects, more qualified and trained creative talent are needed .The rapid rate of digitalization — for example, the shift to online retail due to lockdowns — has opened up new roles in e-commerce with companies rushing to place creative ads on the various social media platforms. Those trends, in turn, have led businesses to implement new digital technologies, resulting in a surge in demand for creative designers especially in the digital area.

Malaysia’s rapidly maturing digital creative industry, which includes animation, movies, and video games, is proving to be a significant growth driver to the nation. In addition, a total of 35,000 jobs will be made available in the arts and creative industry through an allocation of RM100 million under the Pemulih programme announced by the Prime in June 2021.

MDEC, in its South-East Asia Animation Report 2018, said the region’s animation industry was forecast to be US$404.8bil in 2023. Based on the study by MDEC, the country’s creative content industry, which includes film and game developers, generated RM7.4bil in 2017, while in 2018, the animation export product value alone totalled RM146mil.

The industry has also created thousands of job opportunities. The report, released this year, said there were 100 animation companies in Malaysia while the whole national creative digital group totalled 350 companies. The country’s creative content works have been exported to 120 nations.

The next exceptional technology trend – Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), and Extended Reality (ER). VR immerses the user in an environment while AR enhances their environment. Although this technology trend has primarily been used for gaming thus far, it has also been used for training, as with VirtualShip, a simulation software used to train U.S. Navy, Army and Coast Guard ship captains. Around 14 million AR and VR devices were sold in 2019. The global AR and VR market is expected to grow to $209.2 billion by 2022, only creating more opportunities in the trending technology, and welcoming more professionals ready for this game-changing field.

There are many types of designers and roles that they do in a job. The demand for designers in Malaysia will depend on which type of design you specialise in.

  1. Animation
  2. Graphic Design
  3. Interior Design
  4. Multimedia Design
  5. Visual Effects
  6. Augmented Reality (AR) / Virtual Reality (VR)
  7. Game Design

10. Health Science Courses

EduSpiral advised us that the Foundation in Science going into Pharmacy would be our best choice because our STPM results didn't meet the requirements. Leow En Qi and Sin Jie, graduated from Pharmacy at UCSI University
EduSpiral advised us that the Foundation in Science going into Pharmacy would be our best choice because our STPM results didn’t meet the requirements.
Leow En Qi and Sin Jie, graduated from Pharmacy

In particular, its growing ageing population is expected to bring heightened demand due to a high prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in this age demographic. NCDs contributed up to 68% of the burden of premature deaths, majority of which occured in the 45-59 age group.Malaysia’s changing demographics has become a significant contributor in the increased demand for healthcare services, according to a Fitch Solutions report.

The report found that the proportion of the population aged 65 years and above has grown from 3.9% in 2000 to 5.1% in 2015, and it is estimated that the total elderly population in Malaysia will hit 2.4 million by the end of this year.

The country continuously faces a host of health-related issues that require active interventions from healthcare providers. The Ministry of Health is proactively addressing these challenges by enhancing healthcare facilities and services in the country by allocating appropriate resources to empower the public health delivery system.

As the pandemic continues to create uncertainty, health will continue to be a top priority in Malaysia. This means that medical professionals, especially nurses, will continue to be in high demand.

Hiring in healthcare and life sciences also rose, up 26 per cent in Q2 2021, and as reported in the Michael Page Malaysia Talent Trends 2021, the in-demand roles are radiographers, laboratory technologists, clinical research, specialist doctors, and research and development (R&D) scientists.

Finally, according to the Malaysian Physiotherapy Association, currently there is an estimated 2,759 practising physiotherapists in the country which is only 0.88 Per 10,000 population. Therefore, there is a demand for more qualified and trained Physiotherapists.

  1. Nursing
  2. Physiotherapy
  3. Medical Lab Technology (MLT)
  4. Biomedical Science
  5. Medical Imaging

Find the Right Career for Your Future

These are only a choice few of the many careers in Malaysia with promising futures. The most important career is the one that is right for you. EduSpiral is here to help students plan for their careers by exploring different types of careers and understanding the future job demand and salary. Find out your best career for the future and start planning by filling up the enquiry form today.

20 Types of Degree Courses in Malaysia that Guarantee Good Jobs in the Next 10 Years

List of Top 20 Courses to Study in Malaysia with High Job Demand

With the evolution of technology, the current job landscape in Malaysia has changed drastically. In many industries and countries, the current in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even five years ago. The rise of technology has led to a disruption in the way we work and live. The Digital Era of the Industrial Revolution INR 4.0 has changed the way we work and live. Therefore, the course that you choose need to prepare you for the future job that’s filled with technological advancements.

What are you going to study? What career do you want? Which education path are you going to follow to get there? These are the life-changing questions that need well thought out answers after your secondary school. While secondary and university education is about more than just career preparation, what are the necessary skills that will help you to find and keep a job in the future?

Malaysian students who explore, research and plan their potential future lives in work are much better placed to make decisions that are right for them and compete for available jobs when they graduate.

An experienced Education Advisor would be invaluable in assisting you to choose the right course. Students need to talk to the right education counselors so that you get the right information to help you in making this life-changing decision.. The best courses to study are those that have a future high job demand and salary, as well as, suited to your academic knowledge and skills.

You may also be interested in:

For more information on the top private universities and colleges in Malaysia, WhatsApp 01111408838

Please fill up the Form below and I will WhatsApp you and provide you with sound advise on how to choose the best private university or college in Malaysia to study at. If you do not give your mobile number or full name as in IC, your query will not be answered. Our knowledgeable & experienced counsellor will send you a message on WhatsApp & provide assistance from there.

Which are the Best 20 Courses to Study in Malaysia?

I didn't know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what's in demand for the future. Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia
I didn’t know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what’s in demand for the future.
Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is changing the work landscape across all industries, worldwide. The World Economic Forum reports that this could see the displacement of 75 million jobs due to the adoption of new technologies and structural changes in the labour market. However, it also predicted the simultaneous emergence of 133 million new jobs. The key for future success for students after secondary school is to carve a career path that takes advantage of these technological changes but can’t be replaced by them.

By 2030, roles in office support, food service, production and machine operations, and mechanical installation and repairs will have all but disappeared in the US, with similar trends happening in South Africa and the rest of the world. The jobs that will continue to be in demand include health professionals, STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) specialists, creatives, managers, and those in education or workforce training.

You can also expect a rise in jobs that don’t exist yet to meet new or growing needs, such as climate change and environmental issues, or to cater to the longer life expectancy of the global population. Imagine a career change to become a solar power or wind turbine specialist, or reinventing yourself as an urban farmer. Those are recognisable professions with a niche twist, but there are predictions that future roles such as AI psychologist, drone manager, or a quantum data analyst will also exist. There should also be significant growth in health and wellness professionals that can assist in taking care of Malaysia’s ageing population, keeping everyone fit and healthy, and offering the special care and bedside manners missing from machines and robots.

The future of work looks dynamic and exciting. New careers and ways of working are opening up as new technology is introduced, globalisation continues and we adjust to challenges like COVID-19. These changes will reshape the nature of work itself.  By having access to this information, students will be better prepared to make informed career decisions. This will not only help you to manage future risks, but also to maximise future opportunities.

Have You Chosen a Course that’s Future Proof?

"I met up with EduSpiral about 4 times in Ipoh & at Asia Pacific University to discuss about my future. He provided me with in-depth information and even arranged for me to meet up with the Head of School at APU to talk to me." Kar Jun (Left), Accounting graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
“I met up with EduSpiral about 4 times in Ipoh & at Asia Pacific University to discuss about my future. He provided me with in-depth information and even arranged for me to meet up with the Head of School at APU to talk to me.”
Kar Jun (Left), Accounting graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

One of the main aim of getting a university education in Malaysia is to find a stable job so that you can take care of yourself and your family. However, nowadays, with the high cost of living, just finding any job will not do. You will need to find a job that has a high salary.

Part of finding the right career in Malaysia for you will be looking at the future job demand in Malaysia and globally. You don’t want to have completed a degree course and then not be able to find a job or realise that the job pays very low salary. Therefore, it is important for students after high school or Pre-University to choose the right course to study – you don’t want to waste your time and money on a course you don’t want to do or worse being unemployed finding out that the course you have studied does not have any job demand.

Keep in mind, that after graduating, you would want to buy a car, a house, and get married and have children. This means that you will need to have enough money to feed yourself, your spouse, children and most probably your parents. Factor in the costs of healthcare, insurance, education, food, travel, saving for your retirement and other day-to-day expenses and all these amount to a lot of money!

Top 20 Courses to Study in Malaysia

I was interested in choosing a course that has high job demand & salary as well as meet my interests. EduSpiral gave me job reports & statistics to help me choose the right course. Bernice, Digital Marketing at Taylor's University
I was interested in choosing a course that has high job demand & salary as well as meet my interests. EduSpiral gave me job reports & statistics to help me choose the right course.
Bernice, Digital Marketing at Taylor’s University

There are hundreds of courses to choose from after completing your Pre-University or Foundation. However, the courses all have different career prospects as some have higher job demand and salary while others are less. Choosing the right degree programme that will enhance your chances of getting a job after graduation.

To help you decide which course that has a future job demand with high salaries in Malaysia, I have researched and made a list for you to consider.

  1. Computing & Information Technology (IT)
  2. Financial Services
  3. Engineering
  4. Accounting
  5. Marketing
  6. Business & Management
  7. Built Environment
  8. Communications
  9. Logistics
  10. Culinary Arts
  11. Hospitality & Tourism
  12. Game Technology
  13. Medical 
  14. Healthcare
  15. Design
  16. Applied Sciences
  17. Humanities
  18. Social Sciences
  19. Creative Arts
  20. Education

Half of Malaysians work in jobs unrelated to their degrees

EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary. Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate from UCSI University
EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary.
Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate

What you study at university is unlikely to be what you end up doing as a career, with latest YouGov research showing that half (51%) of Malaysian graduates work in jobs unrelated to their degrees. The remaining half (49%) work in jobs related to their degrees.

This isn’t the same across all degrees, however. Those who studied information and communication technology are more likely to end up working in a related field, compared with those who studied business, administration and law. Three in five (58%) of those who studied information and communication technology ended up working in jobs relevant to their degree, as opposed to just two in five of those who did business (39%), administration and law.

Other factors also seem to affect whether someone moves into a job linked to their degree. Those who studied abroad (18%) are more likely than those who studied locally (82%) (56% vs. 48%) to work in jobs related to their degree. Older Malaysians (aged 45 to 54) are also more likely than their younger compatriots (aged 25 to 34) to work in jobs relevant to their degree (59% vs. 47%).

Overall, six in ten (62%) Malaysians find their degrees ‘very useful’. A third (35%) find them somewhat useful, and the remaining 4% find them useless.

When choosing a degree half (49%) were influenced by their parents when selecting their field of study. The rest were influenced by their friends (32%), by themselves (28%) or by their teachers (25%).

The vast majority (97%) of graduates agree that having a university degree is important. Assuming the position of an employer, a quarter (23%) would be unwilling to hire someone without a university degree. Two in five (40%) would be willing, and the remaining third (37%) thinks it makes no difference.

Half of Malaysians work in jobs unrelated to their degrees
Half of Malaysians work in jobs unrelated to their degrees

Do your Research and Find the Most in Demand Job with High Salary in Malaysia so that you can Choose the Right Course to Study

Mr. Lonnie from EduSpiral, guided us in our confusion of which course to take that has a high job demand & salary and after the counseling, we decided on Fintech. Bryan & Wen Kai, Fintech at Asia Pacific University (APU)
Mr. Lonnie from EduSpiral, guided us in our confusion of which course to take that has a high job demand & salary and after the counseling, we decided on Fintech.
Bryan & Wen Kai, Fintech at Asia Pacific University (APU)

The International Labor Organization has estimated that almost 300 million jobs are at risk due to the coronavirus pandemic. Of those that are lost, almost 40% will not come back. According to research by the University of Chicago, they will be replaced by automation to get work done more safely and efficiently.

Particularly at risk are so-called “frontline” jobs – customer service, cashiers, retail assistant, and public transport being just a few examples. But no occupation or profession is entirely future proof. Thanks to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), even tasks previously reserved for highly trained doctors and lawyers – diagnosing illness from medical images, or reviewing legal case history, for example – can now be carried out by machines.

At the same time, the World Economic Forum, in its 2020 Future of Jobs report, finds that 94% of companies in the UK will accelerate the digitization of their operations as a result of the pandemic, and 91% are saying they will provide more flexibility around home or remote working.

The world of work is in constant change. Email, video conferencing, and cloud sharing are now the norm and millions of people now work in the gig economy, rather than on structured payrolls. But perhaps the greatest debate about the future of work is centered on automation, artificial intelligence, and robotics, and their potential effects on jobs.

BETWEEN 3.3 million and 6 million jobs are expected to be created in Malaysia by 2030, but with the new age of automation Industrial 4.0, preparation and training are fast becoming the critical factor as the new workforce would need new skills.

Furthermore, the ever-increasing cost of living in Malaysia is making it challenging for fresh graduates and working professionals to support their lifestyle. In light of that, it would be important for students to plan ahead what career that you want to enter into so that you can choose a course that has future job demand and high salary in Malaysia.

By having a view of emerging job trends, it is hoped that students would be inspired to draw up study plans and select career choices and pathways as early as schooling years up to university level that will ensure success in future careers and work environments.

Choosing the Right Course, Possessing Soft Skills & Having a Good Command Increases Your Chances of Employability

I wasn't sure of which course to study & Lonnie , from EduSpiral, guided me to choose the right course based on Job Demand & Salary. Hong Ming, Foundation in Computing & Technology at KDU University College
I wasn’t sure of which course to study & Lonnie , from EduSpiral, guided me to choose the right course based on Job Demand & Salary. Hong Ming, Foundation in Arts & Technology at UOWM KDU University College

In a research, commissioned by the Ministry of Women and Family and Community Development, it was found that there was very little variation in CGPA between employed and unemployed graduates. This explains why the overall academic performance did not affect the chance of becoming employed graduates. On the other hand, graduates who had higher English proficiencies were employed compared to unemployed graduates.

The study showed that having good grades did not guarantee employment for Malaysian graduates. Therefore, graduates must have a good command of English and other soft skills such as analytical thinking, intelligence, independence, leadership, communication and computer skills and work experience.

The results showed that the chance of being employed rose with an increase in English proficiency. The only significant personality variable is leadership and technical skills and this variable consisted of constructs such as possessing analytical thinking, being intelligent, independent, having leadership skills, communication and computer skills and possessing work experience.

Most of these challenges are more pronounced for graduates who come from rural areas because they are less exposed to speaking in English and almost all of them study in the public universities where Bahasa Malaysia is used as the medium of instruction.

In another study by the Ministry of Higher Education on the National Graduate Employability, Prospective employers complain of fresh Institution of Higher Learning (IHL) graduates lacking the  prerequisite attributes; more than 50% of fresh graduates are deemed to be unsatisfactory in English  communication skills, and yet, many of these young, inexperienced job-seekers expect unrealistically high starting salaries.

Currently, deficiencies are seen in the areas of communication, ICT knowledge, and professional and technical skills which have resulted in an insufficient supply of employable graduates. This situation is further aggravated by university students not pursuing fields of study that are relevant to industry

Every year about 180,000 students graduate with diplomas and degrees from institutions of higher learning. The most common problems identified by employers are:

  • poor command of English (55.8%)
  • poor character, attitude or personality (37.4%)
  • asking for unrealistic salary/benefits (33%)
  • mismatch of skills (30.2%)
  • choosy in job/company (27.7%)
  • no demonstrated ability to solve problems (25.9%)
  • skill knowledge not in-depth enough (23.8%)

As the main demand of industry is to employ graduates who are GSA (Generic Student Attribute) centred, from the above it is obvious that these skills are lacking among fresh graduates.

Choose the Right Course based on Facts & Evidence

Human Resource Management at Asia Pacific University (APU)
I wasn’t sure of what to study & my mother found EduSpiral to talk to me. He helped me to choose a course that suited me & had good job prospects.
Min Yi, Human Resource Management at Asia Pacific University (APU)

And to get a job with a high salary, you need to choose a degree course that has a high job demand and salary. Therefore, you have to do your research in choosing a course that has high job demand and salary. s

Malaysian students are exposed to the internet and to the jobs from overseas countries such as the USA or UK. Many don’t realise that some of these courses are not in demand in Malaysia or may not command a high salary. A lot of students after SPM or O-Levels just blindly follow their friends to the university taking any course as long as they can be with their friends.

Some students choose the course based on the advise of their parents, relatives or friends. Some of their advise could be valuable but some are simply just not based on facts or evidence of good career prospects. Students must check the advise given by so called agents & counsellors, and their friends and relatives to make sure what they said is true and supported by facts and evidence.

Malaysia’s Top 10 Most In-Demand Courses with Future Job Security

Top Ten List of Courses with Future High Job Demand in Malaysia that Students Must Study for a Successful Career

When choosing the right course to study in Malaysia, one important criteria that students should look at is the job demand. Choosing to study a course that has future potential high job demand and salary would ensure that you have a higher chance of a successful career that would support your lifestyle goals.

With the evolution of technology, the current job landscape in Malaysia has changed drastically. In many industries and countries, the current in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even 5 years ago. The rise of technology has led to a disruption in the way we work and live. The Digital Era has changed the way we work.

Malaysian employers are investing in digitalizing companies to enhance their global competitiveness, strengthen growth and productivity while creating high value-added jobs instead of relying on foreign labour. As a testament to government ambition in accelerating Industry 4.0 adoption, an allocation of
RM210 million from 2019 until 2021 will be funded to support the transition of local businesses for “Readiness Assessment Programme” as a commitment to upskilling the workforce.

According to the Malaysian Social Security Organisation (SOCSO), most job replacements in 2018 was brought about by various forms of automation. While the most affected sectors were manufacturing and construction, the agency warns that the banking sector is next. In fact, a 2017 McKinsey global report estimates that 43% of all finance and insurance activities can be automated through technology that is already available.

As the digital economy grows, Malaysia must be prepared to choose jobs that will be in demand in the future as well as still exist. 75 million job roles are expected to disappear by 2022 according to the “Future of Jobs Report 2018” by the World Economic Forum,. Furthermore, another 133 million roles are expected to emerge. McKinsey says its study indicates that by 2030, automation could displace up to 25% of hours (equivalent to about 4.5 million workers) in Malaysia. However, between 3.3 million and 6 million jobs are expected to be created in Malaysia by 2030, but with the new age of automation Industrial 4.0, preparation and training are fast becoming the critical factor as the new workforce would need new skills.

Here at EduSpiral Consultant Services, we do our research on the job demand for the careers in Malaysia, Salary Reports, and universities so that we can advise our students based on facts and evidence. Students need to talk to the right education counsellors so that you get the right information to help you in making this life-changing decision and choose to study a course that has high job demand & salary.

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Please fill up the Form below and I will WhatsApp you and provide you with sound advise on how to choose the best private university or college in Malaysia to study at. If you do not give your mobile number or full name as in IC, your query will not be answered. Our knowledgeable & experienced counsellor will send you a message on WhatsApp & provide assistance from there.

List of the Ten Best Courses in Malaysia with High Job Demand in the Future

I was confused about what to study & at which university. Talking to EduSpiral helped clear my doubts.
Zen Yi, Graduated from Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)

Industry 4.0 is signalling a change in the traditional manufacturing landscape. What are the implications of these future trends to Malaysian students? You must start now to choose the right course that will be able to get you a job in the INR 4.0. In its “Future of Jobs Report 2020,” the World Economic Forum estimates that 85 million jobs will be displaced while 97 million new jobs will be created across 26 countries by 2025. AI will automate many repetitive and sometimes dangerous tasks like data entry and assembly line manufacturing.

In recent years, the world has seen technology develop at an accelerated pace, ushering in a new world that calls for the acquirement of new skills. The impact of technology on jobs cannot be understated, with the rise of automation changing the way tasks are carried out, putting jobs in various industries at risk.

Many of the fastest growing jobs and predicted future ones are driven by technology development, increased Internet connectivity, rapid globalisation and new business demands.

Many Malaysian students are still choosing the traditional and outdated degree programmes that will not equip them to face the new technologically advanced work environment. These students will be jobless or possess skills that would not be relevant in the future jobs in Malaysia.

By having a view of emerging job trends, it is hoped that Malaysian students after secondary school would be inspired to draw up study plans and select career choices and pathways for their university studies that will ensure success in future careers and work environments.

What are the Top 10 Courses to Study that has Future High Job Demand?
1. Computing & Technology Courses
EduSpiral counseled us online & then picked us up from the airport to visit MMU in order to help us choose the right university. Mak, Ong & Chaw - Diploma in Information Technology (IT) at Multimedia University (MMU)
EduSpiral counseled us online & then picked us up from the airport to visit MMU in order to help us choose the right university.
Mak, Ong & Chaw – Diploma in Information Technology (IT) at Multimedia University (MMU)

The Information and Technology (IT) industry continues to relish tremendous growth since the pandemic started. It is one of the fastest growing sectors in the Malaysian market to date. According to a report by GlobalData Market Opportunities Forecasts, IT expenditure in Malaysia will reach RM103.75 billion by 2023.

The National Policy on Industry Revolution 4.0 (Industry4WRD), spearheaded by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), will play a vital role in promoting digitalisation across all sectors. Businesses are starting to pivot their operations to enable remote capabilities, no longer restricted to borders and time zone differences.

Many of the fastest growing jobs and predicted future ones are driven by technology development, increased Internet connectivity, rapid globalisation and new business demands. Tech skills are required in jobs across industries in different roles and functions and this is expected to create demand for tech-based or tech-related jobs.

Jobs like artificial intelligence specialists and data scientists are required across industries to help organisations and businesses be more efficient in delivering their products and services, and be more responsive to customer demands in anticipated increased competition.

Cybersecurity and data systems integration solutions are burgeoning. The essentialities of such services received acknowledgement by SMEs, and the adoption rate reflects the shift. And predictably, the top 10% of job opportunities in Malaysia are cybersecurity related.

Budget 2021 allocated RM27million for cybersecurity programs alone. That itself forms the fundamental building blocks of the digital transition under the Malaysian Digital Economy roadmap. Although data systems integration (internet of things, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, big data analytics) and cybersecurity remains one of the greater potentials, the government is looking into creating 5G ecosystems.

In 2020, Malaysia recorded a shortage of 7,917 experts within the field. This is consistent with global trends, where the speed of digitalisation greatly outpaces the number of skilled talent. The government aims to resolve this shortage with plans of producing 20,000 cybersecurity knowledge workers by 2025 through the MyDIGITAL blueprint.

In February 2021, the government launched its digital blueprint—MyDIGITAL, a roadmap that charts the path towards Malaysia’s vision of becoming a regional leader in the digital economy. Some of these initiatives include increasing the number of local data centres to provide high-end cloud computing services, rolling out 5G networks, and driving greater cybersecurity adoption. MyDIGITAL is expected to create 500,000 new job opportunities in the digital economy and, in effect, contribute 22.6% of Malaysia’s gross domestic product by 2030.

  1. Cyber Security
  2. Data Science or Data Analytics
  3. Artificial Intelligence (Ai) or Intelligent Systems
  4. Robotics
  5. Cloud Computing
  6. Internet of Things (IoT)
  7. Computer Science
  8. Software Engineering or Programming
  9. Information Technology (IT) or Information Communications Technology
  10. Mobile Computing
  11. Network Computing
  12. Games Development
2. Accounting & Financial Services Courses
"I was confused and had some questions. EduSpiral met up with me and my mum to explain more about the course and helped me choose the right course."
“I was confused and had some questions. EduSpiral met up with me and my mum to explain more about the course and helped me choose the right course.”
Gary, Accounting Graduate from University of Wollongong Malaysia (UOWM) KDU

In today’s ever-changing world, banking and finance graduates are highly sought-after in a cross-section of Malaysia’s industries where each offer a variety of job opportunities.  The Financial sector stands as one of the largest sectors in Malaysia with more than 300,000 people employed. This sector is made up by professionals in the AccountingBankingEconomicsFinanceInsurance and Statistics and Taxation sub-sectors.

An important industry for the country, it contributes up to 11 percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).There are many areas in the banking and finance sector in Malaysia where each sub-sector requiring specific knowledge and skills.

As Malaysia’s economy progressively opens up and stabilises from the pandemic, roles within the Banking & Financial sector are rapidly evolving to keep pace with market and growth needs. Bank Negara, Malaysia’s central bank is set to issue its first digital banking licences in Q3 to Q4 2022, a move which is projected to accelerate the mushrooming of Fintech companies in the country.

Accordingly, demand for talent with cross-functional skill sets across finance and tech will rise rapidly as hiring activities increase. The ideal candidate would have experience in the audit, risk, or investment space as well as skills in data analytics and automation.

At the same time, there is also a growing awareness, especially among younger Malaysians, of tech-enabled financial tools such as digital wealth management platforms. As these tools and platforms become more prevalent, banks and financial institutions are progressively moving away from selling structured
products.

Fintech is another area that continues to experience significant growth due to changing consumer behaviour, movement control restrictions, and regulatory changes. According to the Fintech Malaysia Report 2021, online and mobile banking penetration reached 112.5% and 61.8% respectively, with more than 3 million new mobile banking service subscribers and 400,000 new businesses registering for QR code payment acceptance in 2020.

The key in succeeding in the banking & finance industry is choosing the right specialisation, and ensuring you find a career path that best match your abilities and interests. Therefore, having a finance qualification can lead to a rewarding career. A fast-track career in finance depends on a good understanding of market movements and the diverse investment market.

  1. Accounting
  2. Accounting & Finance
  3. Actuarial Science
  4. Banking & Finance
  5. Finance
  6. Financial Technology (Fintech)
3. Business Courses
I was interested in choosing a course that has high job demand & salary as well as meet my interests. EduSpiral gave me job reports & statistics to help me choose the right course. Bernice, Digital Marketing at Taylor's University
I was interested in choosing a course that has high job demand & salary as well as meet my interests. EduSpiral gave me job reports & statistics to help me choose the right course.
Bernice, Digital Marketing at Taylor’s University

E-commerce is seen as one of the bright spots driving Malaysia’s economic recovery, not just for its growing
popularity but also for its growth potential. Many brick and-mortar stores were able to continue their businesses throughout the lockdowns by taking them online. And with platforms like eBay, even micro, small, and medium businesses have a platform to compete in global markets.

As of Q2 2021, Malaysia’s e-commerce income grew 23.3% year-on-year, driven by the manufacturing and services sector. Total gross salaries paid within this sector also increased by 0.4%, equivalent to RM100.5 million.

The e-commerce space is revelling positive growth amidst the pandemic. Retail sectors are occupying the e-commerce space while platforms such as Lazada and Shopee are booming. The government understands the merits of e-commerce enterprises. Thus, implementing various initiatives to strengthen Malaysia’s digital economy.

In addition, there is an allotment of RM300 million for the existing Penjana Micro & SMEs eCommerce, Penjana Shop Malaysia Online, Selangor e-Bazar and Buy Malaysia initiatives by the government encouraging consumers to shop online. As a result, more than 500,000 local SMEs will procure benefits from them.

As of 2020, 83% of the Malaysian population uses the internet, with ​​70% of them frequenting social networking apps, and 61% on shopping apps. Digital marketing has become crucial for brands to reach these prospective customers, thus making roles under this industry highly demanded.

The roles under this umbrella consist of digital marketing specialists who are responsible for creating marketing campaigns and reporting results. Companies are also seeking out content creators for marketing purposes, whether it’s a writer or editor for written content, or a video producer or graphic design artist for visual content. And to ensure content is able to reach audiences, they need to be optimised for search engines like Google. This makes specialists in search engine optimisation (SEO) in demand.

A course that many students overlook is Human Resource Management. Human Resource professionals whose expertise lie in learning and development, talent management, change management and transformation are an extremely sought-after breed, and especially so if such talent possess digital adoption or digital project management experience to boot. The heightened need for greater tech-savvy HR professionals is accelerated by initiatives such as the Malaysian government’s announcement to pump US$720 million into its “Industry Digitalization Transformation Fund”, in its endeavours to enhance its digital economy. A significant US$50 million of which would be used to help small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in their transition to Industry 4.0.

HR leaders who “lean into” new technologies, platforms, and ways of workin will be strongly positioned to have an impact on business results and employee experience. The importance of the HR function to digitalise the modus operandi of businesses has never been more indisputable.

  1. Digital Marketing
  2. Marketing
  3. eBusiness
  4. Human Resource Management (HRM)
  5. Logistics Management
  6. Supply Chain Management,
4. Engineering Courses
Chemical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia
I talked to EduSpiral on WhatsApp and after obtaining all the necessary information. EduSpiral met me and my parents at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia to take us around for a tour.
Aun Jie, Chemical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia

The world will always need engineers, but some specialized fields are growing faster than others. As the population ages, environmental policy changes, and automation takes over more and more aspects of manufacturing, the world needs qualified and experienced engineers to design, develop, test, and implement new strategies to meet the challenges of technological advancements.

In order for the country to become a developed nation, the engineer to population ratio must be 1:100. For Malaysia, with a population of 32 million, the number of engineers should be 300,000. Surprisingly, based on the Education Ministry’s statistics from 1997 to 2020, the average number of engineers produced per year by the local institutions of higher learning, excluding graduates from international universities is about 16,000. The cumulative total of all engineers produced from 1997 to 2020 is estimated to be about 400,000. The number of engineers may be currently surplus for Malaysia.

Unfortunately, the reality is that only 35% of the graduate engineers (GE) registered with the Board of Engineers Malaysia (BEM). BEM is owned by the Malaysian government to administer the registration of PE. Although according to Malaysia’s law through the Registration of Engineers Act 1967 (Revised 2015), all practising engineers must be registered with the BEM as GE to work as an engineer legally. According to the statistic published by BEM in February 2020, only 10% out of 142,000 registered Graduate Engineer (GE) successfully obtained the certification as Professional Engineer, which is less than 4% of all engineers in Malaysia.

The surge in telecommunications and internet usage skyrocketed. Virtual meetings are the norm. Software such as Zoom and other communication platforms are now necessities. Wireless networks and fibre broadband are a must to keep operations and businesses running amidst this pandemic.

Ministry of Finance states that the Malaysian economy expects to rebound between 6.0% and 7.5% through its gross domestic product in 2021. And civil engineering will be the one spurring the recovery.

  1. Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  2. Mechanical Engineering
  3. Mechatronic Engineering
  4. Telecommunications Engineering
  5. Civil Engineering
  6. Petroleum Engineering
  7. Chemical Engineering
5. Humanities Courses

Although lawyers affect nearly every aspect of society in a range of positions and industries, their basic duties are the same–to represent the needs of their clients in civil and criminal trials. Lawyers can specialize in bankruptcy, international, elder, probate, or environmental law. The growing field of intellectual property is also seeing a growing level of attention from lawyers. There are 14,300 registered lawyers in Malaysia.

  1. Law
6. Communication & Social Science Courses
Graduated in Mass Communication from KDU University College
EduSpiral analysed my personality and results, subsequently advised me on choosing the right course as well as the best university that fit me.
John Lai Wai Hong, Graduated in Mass Communication from KDU University College

As of 2020, 83% of the Malaysian population uses the internet, with ​​70% of them frequenting social networking apps, and 61% on shopping apps. Data from LinkedIn shows an astounding increase of 48% for more digital marketers and content creators. Digital marketing has become crucial for brands to reach these prospective customers, thus making roles under this industry highly demanded.

Existing jobs like content creators are now being taken to the next level and being given new dimensions by technology to reach a wider audience through multiple channels and platforms. Bloggers, podcasters, and YouTubers are in demand as companies look to create both tactical and strategic content that will help their customers make sense of the new and rapidly changing environment.

The roles under this umbrella consist of digital marketing specialists who are responsible for creating marketing campaigns and reporting results. Companies are also seeking out content creators for marketing purposes, whether it’s a writer or editor for written content, or a video producer or graphic design artist for visual content.

  1. Mass Communication
  2. Public Relations, Advertising & Brand Management
  3. Film, TV, Video or Broadcasting
  4. Psychology
7. Built Environment Courses
I met EduSpiral a few years ago after completing my Diploma at LKW. I wanted to continue my degree at a better university & EduSpiral showed the number of awards won by First City UC for interior design which convinced me. Jun Hao, Graduated with Interior Architecture & Design at First City University College
I met EduSpiral a few years ago after completing my Diploma at LKW. I wanted to continue my degree at a better university & EduSpiral showed the number of awards won by First City UC for interior design which convinced me.
Jun Hao, Graduated with Interior Architecture & Design at First City University College

The 5-year centralised economic development plan, known as the Malaysia Plan, will be one of the keys to driving the construction sector up to pace again. The government has plans to expand and modernise the public infrastructures within the country. In December 2020, the government approved a 2021 budget worth RM322.5 billion (US$73.3 billion). 73.3% for operational expenditure, 21.4% towards development expenditure and the balance of 5.3% to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic.

As the East Coal Rail Line aims for completion in 2027, others projects continue to boost Malaysia’s construction sector. These include the Mass Rail Transit 2, Light Rail Transit 3, Electrified Double Track Gemas-Johor Bahru, Klang Valley Double Track Phase 2, Pan Borneo Highway and Coastal Highway.

With projects underway, there is a surge in demand for skilled labour workers within the property and construction industry.

  1. Architecture
  2. Interior Architecture
  3. Quantity Survey (QS)
8. Hospitality & Tourism Courses
I didn't know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose. Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism
I didn’t know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose.
Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism

Over six decades, global tourism has experienced steady growth and has been seen as a powerful vehicle for economic benefit and job creation. In 2018, the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) reported that the tourism industry is one of the world’s largest economic sectors contributing 10.4 percent of the world’s gross domestic product (GDP) and creating more than 319 million jobs globally.

While in Malaysia, in the same year, the Department of Statistics revealed that employment in the tourism industry grew by 4.9 percent (3.5 million people), contributing to 23.5 percent of total employment. These statistics provide a clear indication that the tourism industry holds promising prospects for those who intend to venture into this career path.

As long as there is interest to explore places, be it physically or virtually, the promise of securing a job in this sector will always be available. Traditional and current, tourism career options range from working in hotels or resorts, cruise ships, adventure sports centers or even as tour guides leading activities and historical trips.

However, with the advancement in new technologies, tourism-related businesses need to transform the way they operate in order to utilize and adapt to the new emerging opportunities in the current Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR 4.0). Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Blockchain, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality are among the emerging buzzwords in Tourism 4.0. These technologies help to unlock innovation and new potential in the tourism sector. With available data online, more personalized experiences will be created. This will create new markets for future tourism career growth. Online travel agents, tourism influencer marketers and niche tourism are among the disruptors that are expected to cater the demand of future tourism job vacancies.

On the other hand, without doubt the COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected this industry. Many tourism services have had to close down, revenue from the tourism sector decreased and tourism operators were forced to find other alternatives to stay afloat. However, one should not be discouraged as it has been proven in the past, this industry has persevered and rebounded, and undoubtedly will be able to rebuild stronger than ever.

  1. Culinary Arts
  2. Baking or Patisserie 
  3. Events Management
  4. Hotel Management
9. Health Science Courses
EduSpiral advised us that the Foundation in Science going into Pharmacy would be our best choice because our STPM results didn't meet the requirements. Leow En Qi and Sin Jie, graduated from Pharmacy at UCSI University
EduSpiral advised us that the Foundation in Science going into Pharmacy would be our best choice because our STPM results didn’t meet the requirements.
Leow En Qi and Sin Jie, graduated from Pharmacy

Malaysia’s changing demographics has become a significant contributor in the increased demand for healthcare services, according to a Fitch Solutions report.

In particular, its growing ageing population is expected to bring heightened demand due to a high prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in this age demographic. NCDs contributed up to 68% of the burden of premature deaths, majority of which occured in the 45-59 age group.

The report found that the proportion of the population aged 65 years and above has grown from 3.9% in 2000 to 5.1% in 2015, and it is estimated that the total elderly population in Malaysia will hit 2.4 million by the end of this year.

The country continuously faces a host of health-related issues that require active interventions from healthcare providers. The Ministry of Health is proactively addressing these challenges by enhancing healthcare facilities and services in the country by allocating appropriate resources to empower the public health delivery system.

As the pandemic continues to create uncertainty, health will continue to be a top priority in Malaysia. This means that medical professionals, especially nurses, will continue to be in high demand.

Hiring in healthcare and life sciences also rose, up 26 per cent in Q2 2021, and as reported in the Michael Page Malaysia Talent Trends 2021, the in-demand roles are radiographers, laboratory technologists, clinical research, specialist doctors, and research and development (R&D) scientists.

Finally, according to the Malaysian Physiotherapy Association, currently there is an estimated 2,759 practising physiotherapists in the country which is only 0.88 Per 10,000 population. Therefore, there is a demand for more qualified and trained Physiotherapists.

  1. Nursing
  2. Physiotherapy
  3. Medical Lab Technology (MLT)
  4. Biomedical Science
  5. Medical Imaging
10. Design Courses
I didn't come from a rich family but I very much wanted to go to KL to study. EduSpiral helped me to find a good university with affordable fees. Eric Lau, Graduated from Graphic Design at First City University College
I didn’t come from a rich family but I very much wanted to go to KL to study. EduSpiral helped me to find a good university with affordable fees.
Eric Lau, Graduated from Graphic Design at First City University College

The rapid rate of digitalization — for example, the shift to online retail due to lockdowns — has opened up new roles in e-commerce with companies rushing to place creative ads on the various social media platforms. Those trends, in turn, have led businesses to implement new digital technologies, resulting in a surge in demand for creative designers especially in the digital area.

Many companies are tailoring advertising work to digital and direct mail in the hopes of reaching all the online shoppers at home. As companies battle to maintain brand dominance, creative firms and in-house departments are taking on additional projects, more qualified and trained creative talent are needed .

Malaysia’s rapidly maturing digital creative industry, which includes animation, movies, and video games, is proving to be a significant growth driver to the nation. In addition, a total of 35,000 jobs will be made available in the arts and creative industry through an allocation of RM100 million under the Pemulih programme announced by the Prime in June 2021.

MDEC, in its South-East Asia Animation Report 2018, said the region’s animation industry was forecast to be US$404.8bil in 2023. Based on the study by MDEC, the country’s creative content industry, which includes film and game developers, generated RM7.4bil in 2017, while in 2018, the animation export product value alone totalled RM146mil.

The industry has also created thousands of job opportunities. The report, released this year, said there were 100 animation companies in Malaysia while the whole national creative digital group totalled 350 companies. The country’s creative content works have been exported to 120 nations.

The next exceptional technology trend – Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), and Extended Reality (ER). VR immerses the user in an environment while AR enhances their environment. Although this technology trend has primarily been used for gaming thus far, it has also been used for training, as with VirtualShip, a simulation software used to train U.S. Navy, Army and Coast Guard ship captains. Around 14 million AR and VR devices were sold in 2019. The global AR and VR market is expected to grow to $209.2 billion by 2022, only creating more opportunities in the trending technology, and welcoming more professionals ready for this game-changing field.

There are many types of designers and roles that they do in a job. The demand for designers in Malaysia will depend on which type of design you specialise in.

  1. Animation
  2. Graphic Design
  3. Interior Design
  4. Multimedia Design
  5. Visual Effects
  6. Augmented Reality (AR) / Virtual Reality (VR)
  7. Game Design

Students May Be Unemployed  If You Choose a Course that would not be Relevant in the Future

EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university. Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university.
Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

The unemployment rate among Malaysia’s fresh graduates is expected to increase to 25% this year, 2020. In comparison to last year, it is a jump from 13.8%. The Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE) said 75,000 out of 300,000 fresh graduates are expected to be unemployed in 2020 due to the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Furthermore, 41,161 out of 330,557 graduates from 2019 are still unemployed. With the addition of 75,000 from 2020, the total unemployment among the group will add up to a whopping 116,161 people.

Last year, 189,543 out of 330,557 graduates managed to get a job six months after they graduated.

The youth unemployment in Malaysia is at 13.2%. The highest unemployment rate is seen among those aged 15 to 19, at 18.7%, followed by those aged 20 to 24, at 11.9%, according to the Economic Outlook Report 2019 issued by the finance ministry.

Graduates being left behind, possess outdated information and lacking in relevant skills required by the industry, thus contributing to the rising unemployment rate. Therefore, if you don’t plan carefully, you may end up studying a course that has no job demand after you graduate. This would be an incredible waste of your time and money.

Look at Job Demand and Trends in Malaysia when Choosing your Course

When choosing a course, it is important for students to look at the job demand to ensure that there would be a job when they graduate. In addition, check out the salary so that you know that the career that you are planning to choose can sustain your future lifestyle.

Traditionally prestigious professions still have it – those in these jobs remain sought-after today, although their counterparts in the digital industry are in high demand. Despite talk of oversupply, medical specialists, accountants, engineers, architects, pharmacists and dentists are still much needed in Malaysia.

These professionals are crucial for Malaysia to achieve developed nation status. These roles are important in ensuring affordable, quality service, especially healthcare, for the people. On the other hand, the manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and finance and insurance sectors may have too many workers.

Thanks to disruptive technology and the challenging economy, these industries (which were last year’s top retrenched fields) continue to see an oversupply of workers. There are also too many general practitioners, especially in urban areas.

Critical Occupations List (COL)

The Critical Occupations List 2019/2020, which covers 18 key sectors in the country, underscores the need for accountants, engineers, software engineers, ICT professionals and tertiary level educators.

Diploma in Culinary Arts Graduate from YTL International College of Hotel Management
I contacted EduSpiral to find an affordable college for culinary arts. He arranged for me and my mother for a campus tour & helped me find a college that had excellent facilities that I could afford.
Fu Wei, Diploma in Culinary Arts Graduate from YTL International College of Hotel Management

Malaysia’s Human Resources Ministry advised graduates entering the job market to study employment trends. Those thinking of manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and finance and insurance, should know that these sectors topped the retrenchment list last year, it said.

WHILE software developer, recruiter, database developer, information security specialist, data analyst, corporate tax specialist, payroll specialist, business intelligence consultant, regulatory specialist and marketing research specialist, are LinkedIn’s “top 10” most-in-demand talents, those interested in traditionally-popular fields also have reason to be optimistic. Many crucial areas like medicine, engineering and accounting, are still thriving in Malaysia.

And, according to Malaysian Employers Federation executive director Datuk Shamsuddin Bardan, the sales and marketing, hospitality, food and beverage line, are also hiring. He, however, says job seekers are reluctant to enter the sales and marketing profession, viewing the job as too demanding, especially with the need for English proficiency.

Multilingual talents for contact centres and customer service roles are also much-sought after, as are Human Resource professionals to help companies map long-term growth plans, he says. Meanwhile, companies involved in ICT, IT-enabled services and business process outsourcing, education and manufacturing, will continue filling key positions.

Industrial Revolution (INR) 4.0 – Top Courses that You Should Study in Malaysia to be Ready for it

Studying Information Technology (IT) was my dream but my results didn't achieve the requirements. But EduSpiral gave me in-depth advise & helped me to choose the right course that suited me. Harold, Diploma in Business IT at Asia Pacific University (APU)
Studying Information Technology (IT) was my dream but my results didn’t achieve the requirements. But EduSpiral gave me in-depth advise & helped me to choose the right course that suited me. Harold, Diploma in Business IT at Asia Pacific University (APU)

In order to be successful in your future career, students need to plan ahead and find out which jobs would be in demand and be relevant. The Industrial Revolution 4.0 has impacted many jobs and rapidly transformed the future of jobs.

Industry 4.0 is signalling a change in the traditional manufacturing landscape. Also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Industry 4.0 encompasses three technological trends driving this transformation: connectivity, intelligence and flexible automation.

Industry 4.0 converges IT (Information Technology) and OT (Operational Technology), to create a cyber-physical environment. This convergence has been made possible thanks to the emergence of digital solutions and advanced technologies, which are often associated with Industry 4.0.

These technologies are helping to drive manufacturing’s digital transformation through the integration of previously disparate systems and processes through interconnected computer systems across the value and supply chain.

Embracing Industry 4.0, digital manufacturing and the interconnectivity that comes with it opens a myriad of benefits for companies, including greater agility, flexibility and operational performance.

What are the implications of these future trends for key aspects of the future workforce and workplace that would concern you as a student? To address this question, we take a closer look at the major factors that are expected to shape the world of work in the coming decades so that you can be prepared by choosing the right course to study so that you will be prepared for a career in the era of Industrial Revolution 4.0 in Malaysia and globally.

In doing so, our objective is not so much to predict the future but rather to understand what are the changes that technology is impacting jobs of the future. When we understand the future trends, we will know which courses to choose that will enable us to hone our skills to obtain a job that has high demand and salary.

How to Choose the Best Course to Study at the Top Private University in Malaysia

I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course. Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course.
Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

It is important to choose the right course to study – you don’t want to waste your time and money on a course you don’t want to do (or end up dropping out of). To help you decide which course is right for you, make a list of courses that are of interest to you.

Looking at your results in SPM could help you to decide which course you would be good at. If you are good in Maths & Physics then you can consider Engineering courses. Having good results in Chemistry, Biology & Maths, you can think of a career in Food Science, Pharmacy or Medicine. Talking to an experienced education advisor would help you to navigate through this confusing time of choosing the best course that fits you.

Many students after SPM make the mistake of just listening to advise without verifying whether the information given is true or not. In addition, just because you have heard or seen a lot of advertisements by a particular university, doesn’t mean that it is the best in that course.

Many of the course counselors at the universities are paid by the universities to get you to register there, so their main motivation is to get you to register, not to help you make the right choice.

You should also ask yourself if you would still be interested in that subject for a further three or four years – enough to motivate yourself to work and research independently? Remember, you are going to work in this career for the next 50 years after graduation, therefore, you should have a high interest in the course.

The course that you choose should also have a job demand for you after you graduate. Choosing a course that you are passionate about without job demand and you may end up being jobless. Look for statistics and research to support whether there is a job demand for your future career in Malaysia or Singapore. Here at EduSpiral Consultant Services, we do our research on the job demand for the careers in Malaysia, Salary Reports, and universities so that we can advise our students based on facts and evidence.

Now why would you want to talk to EduSpiral Consultant Services when you can contact the private universities directly? Well, EduSpiral Consultant Services staff have more than 15 years experience in counseling students. Having worked in the private education industry, we have in-depth knowledge of each private university and college in what they are good at. We have worked with our partner universities and colleges for many years while the counselors at the private universities or agents’ offices change every few years therefore they would not have the in-depth knowledge of the courses and the university that they are working at.

How to Choose the Right Course to Study in Malaysia?

I didn't know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what's in demand for the future. Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia
I didn’t know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what’s in demand for the future.
Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia

It can be confusing for students to choose the right major for their undergraduate degree studies in Malaysia. Preparations should have been made even before this time but fear not it is still not too late if you have not decided on a career path. It is important for you to research carefully the career that you intend to pursue.

Students after SPM or IGCSE/O-Levels would need to go through some sort of a Pre-University programme before entering into the degree course. Therefore, you still have about 1 to 1.5 years in your Pre-U programme to really figure out what to study for your degree.

It can be confusing to choose the right course. You should carefully think about what are the options available to you. To choose the best course that fits you, you need to consider the following:

  • Look at your results – what are your best & worst subjects, and which subjects are your favourite?
  • What are your interests & hobbies?
  • What is your passion?
  • Job demand for the career of choice. There is no point in choosing a course out of passion and then graduate to find out that you cannot get a job in that field.
  • Salary of the career of choice
  • Discuss the budget for your studies with your parents. There is no point in choosing a course like Pharmacy or Medicine, if you cannot afford it.

Have You Chosen the Right University to Equip You with Future Skills?

EduSpiral advised & helped me choose the best college for A-Levels. And now I have graduated from a top ranked UK University in Malaysia Dexter Leong, A-Levels at HELP Academy & Degree from University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus
EduSpiral advised & helped me choose the best college for A-Levels. And now I have graduated from a top ranked UK University in Malaysia
Dexter Leong, A-Levels at HELP Academy & Degree from University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

With the evolution of technology, the current job landscape in Malaysia has changed drastically. In many industries and countries, the current in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even five years ago. The rise of technology has led to a disruption in the way we work and live. The Digital Era has changed the way we work.

Malaysia government’s focus was also in line with its efforts to meet the challenges of the Industrial Revolution 4.0 (IR 4.0) that requires highly skilled human capital. Therefore, students have to keep in mind whether the university that you have chosen will equip you to face the challenges of a technologically advanced future work environment?

Many students do not give much thought in choosing their university. They just assume that the cheapest, nearest and most convenient university will do. This is a wrong assumption and if you don’t choose the right university with the environment that will enhance your skills, you won’t do well in your future career.

In addition, employers are also seeking candidates with a whole new set of soft skills that are suitable for the new normal. Communication skills and work attitude are some of the important factors that companies look into when hiring a candidate. It’s not always about the technical skills; soft skills matter as well. Therefore, the university that you choose will have an impact on equipping you with these necessary skills.

Having a degree without the right job skills will make you unprepared to perform your job well, hence have less opportunities to advance in your career and continually have low salary.

Ask a Knowledgeable & Experienced Education Consultant in Malaysia to Help you Choose a Top Course to Study

I had taken a course and wasn't doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well. Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College
I had taken a course and wasn’t doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well.
Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College

Choosing a course to study  is not a science, it is a process in finding out who you are and what you are good at. An experienced Education Advisor would be invaluable in assisting you to choose the right course. Students need to talk to the right education counselors so that you get the right information to help you in making this life-changing decision.

Ask the right Education Counselors. Would you ask a Doctor on how to repair your car? Or would you ask a mechanic for medical advise? Although this sounds ridiculous, but many students do listen to advise from young and inexperienced counselors from universities, colleges or agents’ offices.  Talking to an experienced education advisor would help you to navigate through this confusing time of choosing the best course that fits you.

Experienced education counselors are able to analyse your interests, personality and exam results to help you make a list of possible courses for consideration. EduSpiral Consultant Services staff have more than 15 years experience in counseling students. Having worked in the private education industry, we have in-depth knowledge of each private university and college in what they are good at.

EduSpiral Consultant Services has worked with our partner universities and colleges for many years while the counselors at the private universities or agents’ offices change every few years therefore they would not have the in-depth knowledge of the courses and the university that they are working at.

55 Top Courses with Future High Job Demand to Study in Malaysia

55 of the Best Courses in Malaysia with Most In-Demand Jobs that you should consider Studying

When choosing the right course to study in Malaysia, one important criteria that students should look at is the job demand. Choosing to study a course that has future potential high job demand and salary would ensure that you have a higher chance of a successful career that would support your lifestyle goals.

With the evolution of technology, the current job landscape in Malaysia has changed drastically. In many industries and countries, the current in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even 5 years ago. The rise of technology has led to a disruption in the way we work and live. The Digital Era has changed the way we work.

Malaysian employers are investing in digitalizing companies to enhance their global competitiveness, strengthen growth and productivity while creating high value-added jobs instead of relying on foreign labour. As a testament to government ambition in accelerating Industry 4.0 adoption, an allocation of
RM210 million from 2019 until 2021 will be funded to support the transition of local businesses for “Readiness Assessment Programme” as a commitment to upskilling the workforce.

According to the Malaysian Social Security Organisation (SOCSO), most job replacements in 2018 was brought about by various forms of automation. While the most affected sectors were manufacturing and construction, the agency warns that the banking sector is next. In fact, a 2017 McKinsey global report estimates that 43% of all finance and insurance activities can be automated through technology that is already available.

As the digital economy grows, Malaysia must be prepared to choose jobs that will be in demand in the future as well as still exist. 75 million job roles are expected to disappear by 2022 according to the “Future of Jobs Report 2018” by the World Economic Forum,. Furthermore, another 133 million roles are expected to emerge. McKinsey says its study indicates that by 2030, automation could displace up to 25% of hours (equivalent to about 4.5 million workers) in Malaysia. However, between 3.3 million and 6 million jobs are expected to be created in Malaysia by 2030, but with the new age of automation Industrial 4.0, preparation and training are fast becoming the critical factor as the new workforce would need new skills.

Here at EduSpiral Consultant Services, we do our research on the job demand for the careers in Malaysia, Salary Reports, and universities so that we can advise our students based on facts and evidence. Students need to talk to the right education counsellors so that you get the right information to help you in making this life-changing decision and choose to study a course that has high job demand & salary.

You may also be interested in:

Please fill up the Form below and I will WhatsApp you and provide you with sound advise on how to choose the best private university or college in Malaysia to study at. If you do not give your mobile number or full name as in IC, your query will not be answered. Our knowledgeable & experienced counsellor will send you a message on WhatsApp & provide assistance from there.

List of the Top 55 Courses in Malaysia with High Job Demand in the Future

I was confused about what to study & at which university. Talking to EduSpiral helped clear my doubts.
Zen Yi, Graduated from Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)

Industry 4.0 is signalling a change in the traditional manufacturing landscape. What are the implications of these future trends to Malaysian students? You must start now to choose the right course that will be able to get you a job in the INR 4.0. In its “Future of Jobs Report 2020,” the World Economic Forum estimates that 85 million jobs will be displaced while 97 million new jobs will be created across 26 countries by 2025. AI will automate many repetitive and sometimes dangerous tasks like data entry and assembly line manufacturing.

In recent years, the world has seen technology develop at an accelerated pace, ushering in a new world that calls for the acquirement of new skills. The impact of technology on jobs cannot be understated, with the rise of automation changing the way tasks are carried out, putting jobs in various industries at risk.

Many of the fastest growing jobs and predicted future ones are driven by technology development, increased Internet connectivity, rapid globalisation and new business demands.

Many Malaysian students are still choosing the traditional and outdated degree programmes that will not equip them to face the new technologically advanced work environment. These students will be jobless or possess skills that would not be relevant in the future jobs in Malaysia.

By having a view of emerging job trends, it is hoped that Malaysian students after secondary school would be inspired to draw up study plans and select career choices and pathways for their university studies that will ensure success in future careers and work environments.

What are the Top Courses to Study that has Future High Job Demand?
Computing & Technology
EduSpiral counseled us online & then picked us up from the airport to visit MMU in order to help us choose the right university. Mak, Ong & Chaw - Diploma in Information Technology (IT) at Multimedia University (MMU)
EduSpiral counseled us online & then picked us up from the airport to visit MMU in order to help us choose the right university.
Mak, Ong & Chaw – Diploma in Information Technology (IT) at Multimedia University (MMU)

The Information and Technology (IT) industry continues to relish tremendous growth since the pandemic started. It is one of the fastest growing sectors in the Malaysian market to date. According to a report by GlobalData Market Opportunities Forecasts, IT expenditure in Malaysia will reach RM103.75 billion by 2023.

The National Policy on Industry Revolution 4.0 (Industry4WRD), spearheaded by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), will play a vital role in promoting digitalisation across all sectors. Businesses are starting to pivot their operations to enable remote capabilities, no longer restricted to borders and time zone differences.

Many of the fastest growing jobs and predicted future ones are driven by technology development, increased Internet connectivity, rapid globalisation and new business demands. Tech skills are required in jobs across industries in different roles and functions and this is expected to create demand for tech-based or tech-related jobs.

Jobs like artificial intelligence specialists and data scientists are required across industries to help organisations and businesses be more efficient in delivering their products and services, and be more responsive to customer demands in anticipated increased competition.

Cybersecurity and data systems integration solutions are burgeoning. The essentialities of such services received acknowledgement by SMEs, and the adoption rate reflects the shift. And predictably, the top 10% of job opportunities in Malaysia are cybersecurity related.

Budget 2021 allocated RM27million for cybersecurity programs alone. That itself forms the fundamental building blocks of the digital transition under the Malaysian Digital Economy roadmap. Although data systems integration (internet of things, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, big data analytics) and cybersecurity remains one of the greater potentials, the government is looking into creating 5G ecosystems.

In 2020, Malaysia recorded a shortage of 7,917 experts within the field. This is consistent with global trends, where the speed of digitalisation greatly outpaces the number of skilled talent. The government aims to resolve this shortage with plans of producing 20,000 cybersecurity knowledge workers by 2025 through the MyDIGITAL blueprint.

In February 2021, the government launched its digital blueprint—MyDIGITAL, a roadmap that charts the path towards Malaysia’s vision of becoming a regional leader in the digital economy. Some of these initiatives include increasing the number of local data centres to provide high-end cloud computing services, rolling out 5G networks, and driving greater cybersecurity adoption. MyDIGITAL is expected to create 500,000 new job opportunities in the digital economy and, in effect, contribute 22.6% of Malaysia’s gross domestic product by 2030.

  1. Cyber Security
  2. Data Science or Data Analytics
  3. Artificial Intelligence (Ai) or Intelligent Systems
  4. Robotics
  5. Cloud Computing
  6. Internet of Things (IoT)
  7. Computer Science
  8. Software Engineering or Programming
  9. Information Technology (IT) or Information Communications Technology
  10. Mobile Computing
  11. Network Computing
  12. Games Development
Accounting & Financial Services
"I was confused and had some questions. EduSpiral met up with me and my mum to explain more about the course and helped me choose the right course."
“I was confused and had some questions. EduSpiral met up with me and my mum to explain more about the course and helped me choose the right course.”
Gary, Accounting Graduate from University of Wollongong Malaysia (UOWM) KDU

In today’s ever-changing world, banking and finance graduates are highly sought-after in a cross-section of Malaysia’s industries where each offer a variety of job opportunities.  The Financial sector stands as one of the largest sectors in Malaysia with more than 300,000 people employed. This sector is made up by professionals in the AccountingBankingEconomicsFinanceInsurance and Statistics and Taxation sub-sectors.

An important industry for the country, it contributes up to 11 percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).There are many areas in the banking and finance sector in Malaysia where each sub-sector requiring specific knowledge and skills.

As Malaysia’s economy progressively opens up and stabilises from the pandemic, roles within the Banking & Financial sector are rapidly evolving to keep pace with market and growth needs. Bank Negara, Malaysia’s central bank is set to issue its first digital banking licences in Q3 to Q4 2022, a move which is projected to accelerate the mushrooming of Fintech companies in the country.

Accordingly, demand for talent with cross-functional skill sets across finance and tech will rise rapidly as hiring activities increase. The ideal candidate would have experience in the audit, risk, or investment space as well as skills in data analytics and automation.

At the same time, there is also a growing awareness, especially among younger Malaysians, of tech-enabled financial tools such as digital wealth management platforms. As these tools and platforms become more prevalent, banks and financial institutions are progressively moving away from selling structured
products.

Fintech is another area that continues to experience significant growth due to changing consumer behaviour, movement control restrictions, and regulatory changes. According to the Fintech Malaysia Report 2021, online and mobile banking penetration reached 112.5% and 61.8% respectively, with more than 3 million new mobile banking service subscribers and 400,000 new businesses registering for QR code payment acceptance in 2020.

The key in succeeding in the banking & finance industry is choosing the right specialisation, and ensuring you find a career path that best match your abilities and interests. Therefore, having a finance qualification can lead to a rewarding career. A fast-track career in finance depends on a good understanding of market movements and the diverse investment market.

  1. Accounting
  2. Accounting & Finance
  3. Actuarial Science
  4. Banking & Finance
  5. Finance
  6. Financial Technology (Fintech)
Business
I was interested in choosing a course that has high job demand & salary as well as meet my interests. EduSpiral gave me job reports & statistics to help me choose the right course. Bernice, Digital Marketing at Taylor's University
I was interested in choosing a course that has high job demand & salary as well as meet my interests. EduSpiral gave me job reports & statistics to help me choose the right course.
Bernice, Digital Marketing at Taylor’s University

E-commerce is seen as one of the bright spots driving Malaysia’s economic recovery, not just for its growing
popularity but also for its growth potential. Many brick and-mortar stores were able to continue their businesses throughout the lockdowns by taking them online. And with platforms like eBay, even micro, small, and medium businesses have a platform to compete in global markets.

As of Q2 2021, Malaysia’s e-commerce income grew 23.3% year-on-year, driven by the manufacturing and services sector. Total gross salaries paid within this sector also increased by 0.4%, equivalent to RM100.5 million.

The e-commerce space is revelling positive growth amidst the pandemic. Retail sectors are occupying the e-commerce space while platforms such as Lazada and Shopee are booming. The government understands the merits of e-commerce enterprises. Thus, implementing various initiatives to strengthen Malaysia’s digital economy.

In addition, there is an allotment of RM300 million for the existing Penjana Micro & SMEs eCommerce, Penjana Shop Malaysia Online, Selangor e-Bazar and Buy Malaysia initiatives by the government encouraging consumers to shop online. As a result, more than 500,000 local SMEs will procure benefits from them.

As of 2020, 83% of the Malaysian population uses the internet, with ​​70% of them frequenting social networking apps, and 61% on shopping apps. Digital marketing has become crucial for brands to reach these prospective customers, thus making roles under this industry highly demanded.

The roles under this umbrella consist of digital marketing specialists who are responsible for creating marketing campaigns and reporting results. Companies are also seeking out content creators for marketing purposes, whether it’s a writer or editor for written content, or a video producer or graphic design artist for visual content. And to ensure content is able to reach audiences, they need to be optimised for search engines like Google. This makes specialists in search engine optimisation (SEO) in demand.

A course that many students overlook is Human Resource Management. Human Resource professionals whose expertise lie in learning and development, talent management, change management and transformation are an extremely sought-after breed, and especially so if such talent possess digital adoption or digital project management experience to boot. The heightened need for greater tech-savvy HR professionals is accelerated by initiatives such as the Malaysian government’s announcement to pump US$720 million into its “Industry Digitalization Transformation Fund”, in its endeavours to enhance its digital economy. A significant US$50 million of which would be used to help small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in their transition to Industry 4.0.

HR leaders who “lean into” new technologies, platforms, and ways of workin will be strongly positioned to have an impact on business results and employee experience. The importance of the HR function to digitalise the modus operandi of businesses has never been more indisputable.

  1. Digital Marketing
  2. Marketing
  3. eBusiness
  4. Human Resource Management (HRM)
  5. Logistics Management
  6. Supply Chain Management,
Engineering
Chemical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia
I talked to EduSpiral on WhatsApp and after obtaining all the necessary information. EduSpiral met me and my parents at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia to take us around for a tour.
Aun Jie, Chemical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia

The world will always need engineers, but some specialized fields are growing faster than others. As the population ages, environmental policy changes, and automation takes over more and more aspects of manufacturing, the world needs qualified and experienced engineers to design, develop, test, and implement new strategies to meet the challenges of technological advancements.

In order for the country to become a developed nation, the engineer to population ratio must be 1:100. For Malaysia, with a population of 32 million, the number of engineers should be 300,000. Surprisingly, based on the Education Ministry’s statistics from 1997 to 2020, the average number of engineers produced per year by the local institutions of higher learning, excluding graduates from international universities is about 16,000. The cumulative total of all engineers produced from 1997 to 2020 is estimated to be about 400,000. The number of engineers may be currently surplus for Malaysia.

Unfortunately, the reality is that only 35% of the graduate engineers (GE) registered with the Board of Engineers Malaysia (BEM). BEM is owned by the Malaysian government to administer the registration of PE. Although according to Malaysia’s law through the Registration of Engineers Act 1967 (Revised 2015), all practising engineers must be registered with the BEM as GE to work as an engineer legally. According to the statistic published by BEM in February 2020, only 10% out of 142,000 registered Graduate Engineer (GE) successfully obtained the certification as Professional Engineer, which is less than 4% of all engineers in Malaysia.

The surge in telecommunications and internet usage skyrocketed. Virtual meetings are the norm. Software such as Zoom and other communication platforms are now necessities. Wireless networks and fibre broadband are a must to keep operations and businesses running amidst this pandemic.

Ministry of Finance states that the Malaysian economy expects to rebound between 6.0% and 7.5% through its gross domestic product in 2021. And civil engineering will be the one spurring the recovery.

  1. Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  2. Mechanical Engineering
  3. Mechatronic Engineering
  4. Telecommunications Engineering
  5. Civil Engineering
  6. Petroleum Engineering
  7. Chemical Engineering
Humanities

Although lawyers affect nearly every aspect of society in a range of positions and industries, their basic duties are the same–to represent the needs of their clients in civil and criminal trials. Lawyers can specialize in bankruptcy, international, elder, probate, or environmental law. The growing field of intellectual property is also seeing a growing level of attention from lawyers. There are 14,300 registered lawyers in Malaysia.

  1. Law
Built Environment
I met EduSpiral a few years ago after completing my Diploma at LKW. I wanted to continue my degree at a better university & EduSpiral showed the number of awards won by First City UC for interior design which convinced me. Jun Hao, Graduated with Interior Architecture & Design at First City University College
I met EduSpiral a few years ago after completing my Diploma at LKW. I wanted to continue my degree at a better university & EduSpiral showed the number of awards won by First City UC for interior design which convinced me.
Jun Hao, Graduated with Interior Architecture & Design at First City University College

The 5-year centralised economic development plan, known as the Malaysia Plan, will be one of the keys to driving the construction sector up to pace again. The government has plans to expand and modernise the public infrastructures within the country. In December 2020, the government approved a 2021 budget worth RM322.5 billion (US$73.3 billion). 73.3% for operational expenditure, 21.4% towards development expenditure and the balance of 5.3% to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic.

As the East Coal Rail Line aims for completion in 2027, others projects continue to boost Malaysia’s construction sector. These include the Mass Rail Transit 2, Light Rail Transit 3, Electrified Double Track Gemas-Johor Bahru, Klang Valley Double Track Phase 2, Pan Borneo Highway and Coastal Highway.

With projects underway, there is a surge in demand for skilled labour workers within the property and construction industry.

  1. Architecture
  2. Interior Architecture
  3. Quantity Survey (QS)
Communication & Social Science
Graduated in Mass Communication from KDU University College
EduSpiral analysed my personality and results, subsequently advised me on choosing the right course as well as the best university that fit me.
John Lai Wai Hong, Graduated in Mass Communication from KDU University College

As of 2020, 83% of the Malaysian population uses the internet, with ​​70% of them frequenting social networking apps, and 61% on shopping apps. Data from LinkedIn shows an astounding increase of 48% for more digital marketers and content creators. Digital marketing has become crucial for brands to reach these prospective customers, thus making roles under this industry highly demanded.

Existing jobs like content creators are now being taken to the next level and being given new dimensions by technology to reach a wider audience through multiple channels and platforms. Bloggers, podcasters, and YouTubers are in demand as companies look to create both tactical and strategic content that will help their customers make sense of the new and rapidly changing environment.

The roles under this umbrella consist of digital marketing specialists who are responsible for creating marketing campaigns and reporting results. Companies are also seeking out content creators for marketing purposes, whether it’s a writer or editor for written content, or a video producer or graphic design artist for visual content.

  1. Mass Communication
  2. Public Relations, Advertising & Brand Management
  3. Film, TV, Video or Broadcasting
  4. Psychology
Hospitality & Tourism
I didn't know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose. Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism
I didn’t know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose.
Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism

Over six decades, global tourism has experienced steady growth and has been seen as a powerful vehicle for economic benefit and job creation. In 2018, the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) reported that the tourism industry is one of the world’s largest economic sectors contributing 10.4 percent of the world’s gross domestic product (GDP) and creating more than 319 million jobs globally.

While in Malaysia, in the same year, the Department of Statistics revealed that employment in the tourism industry grew by 4.9 percent (3.5 million people), contributing to 23.5 percent of total employment. These statistics provide a clear indication that the tourism industry holds promising prospects for those who intend to venture into this career path.

As long as there is interest to explore places, be it physically or virtually, the promise of securing a job in this sector will always be available. Traditional and current, tourism career options range from working in hotels or resorts, cruise ships, adventure sports centers or even as tour guides leading activities and historical trips.

However, with the advancement in new technologies, tourism-related businesses need to transform the way they operate in order to utilize and adapt to the new emerging opportunities in the current Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR 4.0). Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Blockchain, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality are among the emerging buzzwords in Tourism 4.0. These technologies help to unlock innovation and new potential in the tourism sector. With available data online, more personalized experiences will be created. This will create new markets for future tourism career growth. Online travel agents, tourism influencer marketers and niche tourism are among the disruptors that are expected to cater the demand of future tourism job vacancies.

On the other hand, without doubt the COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected this industry. Many tourism services have had to close down, revenue from the tourism sector decreased and tourism operators were forced to find other alternatives to stay afloat. However, one should not be discouraged as it has been proven in the past, this industry has persevered and rebounded, and undoubtedly will be able to rebuild stronger than ever.

  1. Culinary Arts
  2. Baking or Patisserie 
  3. Events Management
  4. Hotel Management
Health Sciences
EduSpiral advised us that the Foundation in Science going into Pharmacy would be our best choice because our STPM results didn't meet the requirements. Leow En Qi and Sin Jie, graduated from Pharmacy at UCSI University
EduSpiral advised us that the Foundation in Science going into Pharmacy would be our best choice because our STPM results didn’t meet the requirements.
Leow En Qi and Sin Jie, graduated from Pharmacy

Malaysia’s changing demographics has become a significant contributor in the increased demand for healthcare services, according to a Fitch Solutions report.

In particular, its growing ageing population is expected to bring heightened demand due to a high prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in this age demographic. NCDs contributed up to 68% of the burden of premature deaths, majority of which occured in the 45-59 age group.

The report found that the proportion of the population aged 65 years and above has grown from 3.9% in 2000 to 5.1% in 2015, and it is estimated that the total elderly population in Malaysia will hit 2.4 million by the end of this year.

The country continuously faces a host of health-related issues that require active interventions from healthcare providers. The Ministry of Health is proactively addressing these challenges by enhancing healthcare facilities and services in the country by allocating appropriate resources to empower the public health delivery system.

As the pandemic continues to create uncertainty, health will continue to be a top priority in Malaysia. This means that medical professionals, especially nurses, will continue to be in high demand.

Hiring in healthcare and life sciences also rose, up 26 per cent in Q2 2021, and as reported in the Michael Page Malaysia Talent Trends 2021, the in-demand roles are radiographers, laboratory technologists, clinical research, specialist doctors, and research and development (R&D) scientists.

Finally, according to the Malaysian Physiotherapy Association, currently there is an estimated 2,759 practising physiotherapists in the country which is only 0.88 Per 10,000 population. Therefore, there is a demand for more qualified and trained Physiotherapists.

  1. Nursing
  2. Physiotherapy
  3. Medical Lab Technology (MLT)
  4. Biomedical Science
  5. Medical Imaging
Design
I didn't come from a rich family but I very much wanted to go to KL to study. EduSpiral helped me to find a good university with affordable fees. Eric Lau, Graduated from Graphic Design at First City University College
I didn’t come from a rich family but I very much wanted to go to KL to study. EduSpiral helped me to find a good university with affordable fees.
Eric Lau, Graduated from Graphic Design at First City University College

The rapid rate of digitalization — for example, the shift to online retail due to lockdowns — has opened up new roles in e-commerce with companies rushing to place creative ads on the various social media platforms. Those trends, in turn, have led businesses to implement new digital technologies, resulting in a surge in demand for creative designers especially in the digital area.

Many companies are tailoring advertising work to digital and direct mail in the hopes of reaching all the online shoppers at home. As companies battle to maintain brand dominance, creative firms and in-house departments are taking on additional projects, more qualified and trained creative talent are needed .

Malaysia’s rapidly maturing digital creative industry, which includes animation, movies, and video games, is proving to be a significant growth driver to the nation. In addition, a total of 35,000 jobs will be made available in the arts and creative industry through an allocation of RM100 million under the Pemulih programme announced by the Prime in June 2021.

MDEC, in its South-East Asia Animation Report 2018, said the region’s animation industry was forecast to be US$404.8bil in 2023. Based on the study by MDEC, the country’s creative content industry, which includes film and game developers, generated RM7.4bil in 2017, while in 2018, the animation export product value alone totalled RM146mil.

The industry has also created thousands of job opportunities. The report, released this year, said there were 100 animation companies in Malaysia while the whole national creative digital group totalled 350 companies. The country’s creative content works have been exported to 120 nations.

The next exceptional technology trend – Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), and Extended Reality (ER). VR immerses the user in an environment while AR enhances their environment. Although this technology trend has primarily been used for gaming thus far, it has also been used for training, as with VirtualShip, a simulation software used to train U.S. Navy, Army and Coast Guard ship captains. Around 14 million AR and VR devices were sold in 2019. The global AR and VR market is expected to grow to $209.2 billion by 2022, only creating more opportunities in the trending technology, and welcoming more professionals ready for this game-changing field.

There are many types of designers and roles that they do in a job. The demand for designers in Malaysia will depend on which type of design you specialise in.

  1. Animation
  2. Graphic Design
  3. Interior Design
  4. Multimedia Design
  5. Visual Effects
  6. Augmented Reality (AR) / Virtual Reality (VR)
  7. Game Design

Students May Be Unemployed  If You Choose a Course that would not be Relevant in the Future

EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university. Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university.
Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

The unemployment rate among Malaysia’s fresh graduates is expected to increase to 25% this year, 2020. In comparison to last year, it is a jump from 13.8%. The Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE) said 75,000 out of 300,000 fresh graduates are expected to be unemployed in 2020 due to the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Furthermore, 41,161 out of 330,557 graduates from 2019 are still unemployed. With the addition of 75,000 from 2020, the total unemployment among the group will add up to a whopping 116,161 people.

Last year, 189,543 out of 330,557 graduates managed to get a job six months after they graduated.

The youth unemployment in Malaysia is at 13.2%. The highest unemployment rate is seen among those aged 15 to 19, at 18.7%, followed by those aged 20 to 24, at 11.9%, according to the Economic Outlook Report 2019 issued by the finance ministry.

Graduates being left behind, possess outdated information and lacking in relevant skills required by the industry, thus contributing to the rising unemployment rate. Therefore, if you don’t plan carefully, you may end up studying a course that has no job demand after you graduate. This would be an incredible waste of your time and money.

Look at Job Demand and Trends in Malaysia when Choosing your Course

When choosing a course, it is important for students to look at the job demand to ensure that there would be a job when they graduate. In addition, check out the salary so that you know that the career that you are planning to choose can sustain your future lifestyle.

Traditionally prestigious professions still have it – those in these jobs remain sought-after today, although their counterparts in the digital industry are in high demand. Despite talk of oversupply, medical specialists, accountants, engineers, architects, pharmacists and dentists are still much needed in Malaysia.

These professionals are crucial for Malaysia to achieve developed nation status. These roles are important in ensuring affordable, quality service, especially healthcare, for the people. On the other hand, the manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and finance and insurance sectors may have too many workers.

Thanks to disruptive technology and the challenging economy, these industries (which were last year’s top retrenched fields) continue to see an oversupply of workers. There are also too many general practitioners, especially in urban areas.

Critical Occupations List (COL)

The Critical Occupations List 2019/2020, which covers 18 key sectors in the country, underscores the need for accountants, engineers, software engineers, ICT professionals and tertiary level educators.

Diploma in Culinary Arts Graduate from YTL International College of Hotel Management
I contacted EduSpiral to find an affordable college for culinary arts. He arranged for me and my mother for a campus tour & helped me find a college that had excellent facilities that I could afford.
Fu Wei, Diploma in Culinary Arts Graduate from YTL International College of Hotel Management

Malaysia’s Human Resources Ministry advised graduates entering the job market to study employment trends. Those thinking of manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and finance and insurance, should know that these sectors topped the retrenchment list last year, it said.

WHILE software developer, recruiter, database developer, information security specialist, data analyst, corporate tax specialist, payroll specialist, business intelligence consultant, regulatory specialist and marketing research specialist, are LinkedIn’s “top 10” most-in-demand talents, those interested in traditionally-popular fields also have reason to be optimistic. Many crucial areas like medicine, engineering and accounting, are still thriving in Malaysia.

And, according to Malaysian Employers Federation executive director Datuk Shamsuddin Bardan, the sales and marketing, hospitality, food and beverage line, are also hiring. He, however, says job seekers are reluctant to enter the sales and marketing profession, viewing the job as too demanding, especially with the need for English proficiency.

Multilingual talents for contact centres and customer service roles are also much-sought after, as are Human Resource professionals to help companies map long-term growth plans, he says. Meanwhile, companies involved in ICT, IT-enabled services and business process outsourcing, education and manufacturing, will continue filling key positions.

Industrial Revolution (INR) 4.0 – Top Courses that You Should Study in Malaysia to be Ready for it

Studying Information Technology (IT) was my dream but my results didn't achieve the requirements. But EduSpiral gave me in-depth advise & helped me to choose the right course that suited me. Harold, Diploma in Business IT at Asia Pacific University (APU)
Studying Information Technology (IT) was my dream but my results didn’t achieve the requirements. But EduSpiral gave me in-depth advise & helped me to choose the right course that suited me. Harold, Diploma in Business IT at Asia Pacific University (APU)

In order to be successful in your future career, students need to plan ahead and find out which jobs would be in demand and be relevant. The Industrial Revolution 4.0 has impacted many jobs and rapidly transformed the future of jobs.

Industry 4.0 is signalling a change in the traditional manufacturing landscape. Also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Industry 4.0 encompasses three technological trends driving this transformation: connectivity, intelligence and flexible automation.

Industry 4.0 converges IT (Information Technology) and OT (Operational Technology), to create a cyber-physical environment. This convergence has been made possible thanks to the emergence of digital solutions and advanced technologies, which are often associated with Industry 4.0.

These technologies are helping to drive manufacturing’s digital transformation through the integration of previously disparate systems and processes through interconnected computer systems across the value and supply chain.

Embracing Industry 4.0, digital manufacturing and the interconnectivity that comes with it opens a myriad of benefits for companies, including greater agility, flexibility and operational performance.

What are the implications of these future trends for key aspects of the future workforce and workplace that would concern you as a student? To address this question, we take a closer look at the major factors that are expected to shape the world of work in the coming decades so that you can be prepared by choosing the right course to study so that you will be prepared for a career in the era of Industrial Revolution 4.0 in Malaysia and globally.

In doing so, our objective is not so much to predict the future but rather to understand what are the changes that technology is impacting jobs of the future. When we understand the future trends, we will know which courses to choose that will enable us to hone our skills to obtain a job that has high demand and salary.

How to Choose the Best Course to Study at the Top Private University in Malaysia

I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course. Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course.
Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

It is important to choose the right course to study – you don’t want to waste your time and money on a course you don’t want to do (or end up dropping out of). To help you decide which course is right for you, make a list of courses that are of interest to you.

Looking at your results in SPM could help you to decide which course you would be good at. If you are good in Maths & Physics then you can consider Engineering courses. Having good results in Chemistry, Biology & Maths, you can think of a career in Food Science, Pharmacy or Medicine. Talking to an experienced education advisor would help you to navigate through this confusing time of choosing the best course that fits you.

Many students after SPM make the mistake of just listening to advise without verifying whether the information given is true or not. In addition, just because you have heard or seen a lot of advertisements by a particular university, doesn’t mean that it is the best in that course.

Many of the course counselors at the universities are paid by the universities to get you to register there, so their main motivation is to get you to register, not to help you make the right choice.

You should also ask yourself if you would still be interested in that subject for a further three or four years – enough to motivate yourself to work and research independently? Remember, you are going to work in this career for the next 50 years after graduation, therefore, you should have a high interest in the course.

The course that you choose should also have a job demand for you after you graduate. Choosing a course that you are passionate about without job demand and you may end up being jobless. Look for statistics and research to support whether there is a job demand for your future career in Malaysia or Singapore. Here at EduSpiral Consultant Services, we do our research on the job demand for the careers in Malaysia, Salary Reports, and universities so that we can advise our students based on facts and evidence.

Now why would you want to talk to EduSpiral Consultant Services when you can contact the private universities directly? Well, EduSpiral Consultant Services staff have more than 15 years experience in counseling students. Having worked in the private education industry, we have in-depth knowledge of each private university and college in what they are good at. We have worked with our partner universities and colleges for many years while the counselors at the private universities or agents’ offices change every few years therefore they would not have the in-depth knowledge of the courses and the university that they are working at.

How to Choose the Right Course to Study in Malaysia?

I didn't know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what's in demand for the future. Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia
I didn’t know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what’s in demand for the future.
Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia

It can be confusing for students to choose the right major for their undergraduate degree studies in Malaysia. Preparations should have been made even before this time but fear not it is still not too late if you have not decided on a career path. It is important for you to research carefully the career that you intend to pursue.

Students after SPM or IGCSE/O-Levels would need to go through some sort of a Pre-University programme before entering into the degree course. Therefore, you still have about 1 to 1.5 years in your Pre-U programme to really figure out what to study for your degree.

It can be confusing to choose the right course. You should carefully think about what are the options available to you. To choose the best course that fits you, you need to consider the following:

  • Look at your results – what are your best & worst subjects, and which subjects are your favourite?
  • What are your interests & hobbies?
  • What is your passion?
  • Job demand for the career of choice. There is no point in choosing a course out of passion and then graduate to find out that you cannot get a job in that field.
  • Salary of the career of choice
  • Discuss the budget for your studies with your parents. There is no point in choosing a course like Pharmacy or Medicine, if you cannot afford it.

Have You Chosen the Right University to Equip You with Future Skills?

EduSpiral advised & helped me choose the best college for A-Levels. And now I have graduated from a top ranked UK University in Malaysia Dexter Leong, A-Levels at HELP Academy & Degree from University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus
EduSpiral advised & helped me choose the best college for A-Levels. And now I have graduated from a top ranked UK University in Malaysia
Dexter Leong, A-Levels at HELP Academy & Degree from University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

With the evolution of technology, the current job landscape in Malaysia has changed drastically. In many industries and countries, the current in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even five years ago. The rise of technology has led to a disruption in the way we work and live. The Digital Era has changed the way we work.

Malaysia government’s focus was also in line with its efforts to meet the challenges of the Industrial Revolution 4.0 (IR 4.0) that requires highly skilled human capital. Therefore, students have to keep in mind whether the university that you have chosen will equip you to face the challenges of a technologically advanced future work environment?

Many students do not give much thought in choosing their university. They just assume that the cheapest, nearest and most convenient university will do. This is a wrong assumption and if you don’t choose the right university with the environment that will enhance your skills, you won’t do well in your future career.

In addition, employers are also seeking candidates with a whole new set of soft skills that are suitable for the new normal. Communication skills and work attitude are some of the important factors that companies look into when hiring a candidate. It’s not always about the technical skills; soft skills matter as well. Therefore, the university that you choose will have an impact on equipping you with these necessary skills.

Having a degree without the right job skills will make you unprepared to perform your job well, hence have less opportunities to advance in your career and continually have low salary.

Ask a Knowledgeable & Experienced Education Consultant in Malaysia to Help you Choose a Top Course to Study

I had taken a course and wasn't doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well. Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College
I had taken a course and wasn’t doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well.
Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College

Choosing a course to study  is not a science, it is a process in finding out who you are and what you are good at. An experienced Education Advisor would be invaluable in assisting you to choose the right course. Students need to talk to the right education counselors so that you get the right information to help you in making this life-changing decision.

Ask the right Education Counselors. Would you ask a Doctor on how to repair your car? Or would you ask a mechanic for medical advise? Although this sounds ridiculous, but many students do listen to advise from young and inexperienced counselors from universities, colleges or agents’ offices.  Talking to an experienced education advisor would help you to navigate through this confusing time of choosing the best course that fits you.

Experienced education counselors are able to analyse your interests, personality and exam results to help you make a list of possible courses for consideration. EduSpiral Consultant Services staff have more than 15 years experience in counseling students. Having worked in the private education industry, we have in-depth knowledge of each private university and college in what they are good at.

EduSpiral Consultant Services has worked with our partner universities and colleges for many years while the counselors at the private universities or agents’ offices change every few years therefore they would not have the in-depth knowledge of the courses and the university that they are working at.

Top 20 Courses Best for a Career in Industry 4.0 in Malaysia

Industrial Revolution (INR) 4.0 – Top Courses that You Should Study in Malaysia to be Ready for it

  • Industry 4.0, also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, is all about making business smarter and more automated.
  • What technologies are driving Industry 4.0
  • Top 20 Courses for a Career in Industry 4.0 in Malaysia

What are the implications of these future trends for key aspects of the future workforce and workplace that would concern you as a student? To address this question, we take a closer look at the major factors that are expected to shape the world of work in the coming decades so that you can be prepared by choosing the right course to study.

In doing so, our objective is not so much to predict the future but rather to understand what are the changes that technology in the era of Industry 4.0 is impacting jobs of the future. When we understand the future trends, we will know which courses to choose that will enable us to hone our skills to obtain a job that has high demand and salary.

You might also be interested to read these:

Please fill up the Form below and I will WhatsApp you and provide you with sound advise on how to choose the best private university or college in Malaysia to study at. If you do not give your mobile number or full name as in IC, your query will not be answered. Our knowledgeable & experienced counsellor will send you a message on WhatsApp & provide assistance from there.

Which are the Top 20 Courses for a Career in Industry 4.0 in Malaysia?

Industry 4.0 is signalling a change in the traditional manufacturing landscape. Also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Industry 4.0 encompasses three technological trends driving this transformation: connectivity, intelligence and flexible automation.

Industry 4.0 converges IT (Information Technology) and OT (Operational Technology), to create a cyber-physical environment. This convergence has been made possible thanks to the emergence of digital solutions and advanced technologies, which are often associated with Industry 4.0.

These technologies are helping to drive manufacturing’s digital transformation through the integration of previously disparate systems and processes through interconnected computer systems across the value and supply chain.

Embracing Industry 4.0, digital manufacturing and the interconnectivity that comes with it opens a myriad of benefits for companies, including greater agility, flexibility and operational performance.

Check out the best careers that you can get today as well as the ones that are more futuristic:

  1. Computer Science
  2. Software development or Software Engineering
  3. Information Technology (IT)
  4. Cybersecurity
  5. Data science
  6. Artificial Intelligence (AI)
  7. Internet of Things (IOT)
  8. Financial Technology (Fintech)
  9. Cloud Computing
  10. Blockchain
  11. Game Development
  12. Network Computing
  13. Mobile Computing
  14. Augmented Reality (AR)/Virtual Reality (VR)
  15. Engineering
  16. Mechatronic Engineering
  17. Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  18. Mechanical Engineering
  19. Robotics Engineering
  20. Telecommunications Engineering

What is Industry Revolution 4.0?

EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university. Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university.
Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

Industry 4.0, also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, is all about making business smarter and more automated. Where the Third Industrial Revolution focused on switching mechanical and analog processes to digital ones, the Fourth Industrial Revolution focuses on deepening the impact of our digital technologies by making our machines more self-sufficient, able to “talk” to one another, and to consider massive amounts of data in ways that humans simply can’t—all in the name of efficiency and growth. Industry 4.0 technology represents a foundational shift in how businesses operate, as fundamental as the change from steam power to electricity in the Second Industrial Revolution.

Industry 4.0 is revolutionizing the way companies manufacture, improve and distribute their products. Manufacturers are integrating enabling technologies, including Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing and analytics, and AI and machine learning into their production facilities and throughout their operations. These smart factories are equipped with advanced sensors, embedded software and robotics that collect and analyze data and allow for better decision making. Even higher value is created when data from production operations is combined with operational data from ERP, supply chain, customer service and other enterprise systems to create whole new levels of visibility and insight from previously siloed information. This technology leads to increased automation, predictive maintenance, self-optimization of process improvements and, above all, a new level of efficiencies and responsiveness to customers not previously possible.

Developing smart factories provides an incredible opportunity for manufacturers entering the fourth industrial revolution. Analyzing the large amounts of data collected from sensors on the factory floor ensures real-time visibility of manufacturing assets and can provide tools for performing predictive maintenance in order to minimize equipment downtime.

Using IoT devices in smart factories leads to higher productivity and improved quality. Replacing manual inspection with AI-powered visual insights reduces manufacturing errors and saves money and time. With minimal investment, quality control personnel can set up a smartphone connected to the cloud to monitor manufacturing processes from virtually anywhere. By applying machine learning algorithms, manufacturers can detect errors immediately, rather than at later stages when repair work is more expensive.

Industry 4.0 concepts and technologies can be applied across all types of industrial companies, including discrete and process manufacturing, as well as oil and gas, mining and other industrial segments.

Industry 4.0 optimizes the computerization of Industry 3.0

EduSpiral took me on a campus tour & gave in-depth information to help me decide. Eugene Ong, Electrical & Electronic Engineering at UCSI University
EduSpiral took me on a campus tour & gave in-depth information to help me decide.
Eugene Ong, Electrical & Electronic Engineering Graduate

When computers were introduced in Industry 3.0, it was disruptive thanks to the addition of an entirely new technology. Now, and into the future as Industry 4.0 unfolds, computers are connected and communicate with one another to ultimately make decisions without human involvement. A combination of cyber-physical systems, the Internet of Things and the Internet of Systems make Industry 4.0 possible and the smart factory a reality. As a result of the support of smart machines that keep getting smarter as they get access to more data, our factories will become more efficient and productive and less wasteful. Ultimately, it’s the network of these machines that are digitally connected with one another and create and share information that results in the true power of Industry 4.0.

Malaysia Lacks the Talent to Work in Industry 4.0 Jobs

The Malaysian Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) tabled the the National Policy for Industry 4.0 to help advance the countries’ businesses and factories. This will ideally help the local industries to increase productivity, efficiency, quality, and to also develop new skills and talent with the people.

According to MITI, Malaysia is currently somewhere in between Industry 2.0, which is mass production of items, and Industry 3.0, automation. It is a slow process that is facing many challenges such as the lack of awareness and understanding of Industry 4.0 and also the lack of standards and skillsets.

Industry 4.0 is the new approach to combining traditional manufacturing processes and technology such as the Internet of Things (IoT) to enable machines to capture and convey more data via machine-to-machine communications to enable businesses to make smarter decisions.

All these have to be mobilised by a workforce equipped with the necessary skill sets to develop systems, applications and services such as artificial intelligence, Big Data and advanced analytics, robotics and automation.

In terms of preparing the necessary skilled manpower (for Industry 4.0), Indonesia and Singapore are far ahead (of Malaysia) because they have specific programmes from abroad for their workers to learn from

Malaysia did not have a standard system to produce graduates with the necessary skills for Industry 4.0, Ganesh said the local university syllabuses were somewhat out of date and did not fulfill the requirements of Industry 4.0.

“After completing their studies, our (university) graduates have to be retaught to master 4.0 elements like additive manufacturing and robotics, that is, how to handle and manage robots and so on

Unfortunately, many of the local industries were still depending on manual labour to carry out their operations, he said.

He also said that Malaysia has to seek out foreign technology to enable it to approach Industry 4.0 due to the shortage of efforts locally to develop home-grown technology to meet the needs of the new industry.

What technologies are driving Industry 4.0?

  • Data Science & Data Analytics
  • Autonomous Robots & Advanced robotics
  • Simulation/Digital Twins
  • Horizontal and Vertical Systems
  • Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)
  • Cybersecurity Technology
  • Cloud Computing
  • Additive Manufacturing (AM)
  • Artificial Intelligence (Ai) & Machine Learning
  • Augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR)
Data Science & Data Analytics

Data science combines the scientific method, math and statistics, specialized programming, advanced analytics, AI, and even storytelling to uncover and explain the business insights buried in data.

Data science is a multidisciplinary approach to extracting actionable insights from the large and ever-increasing volumes of data collected and created by today’s organizations. Data science encompasses preparing data for analysis and processing, performing advanced data analysis, and presenting the results to reveal patterns and enable stakeholders to draw informed conclusions.

Autonomous Robots & Advanced robotics
I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream. Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor's University
I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream.
Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor’s University

Robotics play a major role in the manufacturing landscape today. Automated manufacturing solutions should be a key part of any operation that strives for maximum efficiency, safety and competitive advantage in the market. Manufacturing robots automate repetitive tasks, reduce margins of error to negligible rates, and enable human workers to focus on more productive areas of the operation.

Robots used in manufacturing fill numerous roles. Fully autonomous robots in manufacturing are commonly needed for high-volume, repetitive processes — where the speed, accuracy and durability of a robot offers unparalleled advantages. Other manufacturing automation solutions include robots used to help people with more intricate tasks. The robot executes components of the process such as lifting, holding and moving heavy pieces.

Compared with conventional robots, advanced robots have superior perception, integrability, adaptability, and mobility. These improvements permit faster setup, commissioning, and reconfiguration, as well as more efficient and stable operations. The cost of this sophisticated equipment will decline as prices for sensors and computing power decrease, and as software increasingly replaces hardware as the primary driver of functionality. Taken together, these improvements mean that advanced robots will be able to perform many tasks more economically than the previous generation of automated systems.

Producers are now deploying advanced robotics as an essential element of advanced automation that enables the self-controlled factory of the future. Enhancing plant structures and processes with digital technologies can increase productivity and flexibility in both the factory and the supply chain, enabling producers to rapidly adjust to changing customer needs.

Simulation/Digital Twins
Mechatronic Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)
I met EduSpiral and he helped me to filter all the information from the universities and choose the best university that fit me.
Vincent Hoy, Graduated from Mechatronic Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)

Simulations are used across industry to test products, systems, processes, and concepts. Often used during the design phase, simulations are often digital models using computer-aided design software applications. These models can be created in 2D or 3D to represent parts of a process or product, although they can also be created using mathematical concepts rather than computer-based models. The simulation works by introducing and testing different variables into the digital environment or interface to assess outcomes.

The digital transformation offered by Industry 4.0 has allowed manufacturers to create digital twins that are virtual replicas of processes, production lines, factories and supply chains. A digital twin is created by pulling data from IoT sensors, devices, PLCs and other objects connected to the internet. Manufacturers can use digital twins to help increase productivity, improve workflows and design new products. By simulating a production process, for example, manufacturers can test changes to the process to find ways to minimize downtime or improve capacity.

A digital twin is a virtual model that is created to accurately reflect an existing physical object. The physical object is fitted with sensors that produce data about different aspects of the object’s performance, for example on a wind turbine. This data is then relayed to a processing system and applied to the digital model. This digital model, or twin, can then be used to run simulations, study current performance and generate potential improvements that can then be applied back to the actual physical asset. A digital twin can also be created for non-physical processes and systems, mirroring the actual process or system and allowing simulations to be run based on real-time data.

The data used by digital twins is usually collected from Internet of Things (IoT) enabled devices, allowing for the capture of high-level information that can then be integrated into the virtual model.

A digital twin is, in effect, a virtual environment where ideas can be tested with few limitations. With an IoT platform, the model becomes an integrated, closed-loop twin that can be used to inform and drive strategy across a business.

A simulation replicates what could happen to a product, but a digital twin replicates what is happening to an actual specific product in the real world. Any changes to a simulation are limited to the imagination of a designer who needs to input any changes. However, because a digital twin offers real feedback, the designer can see if it is working as intended and then determine any improvements based on actual use. This translates from assets to other applications, such as for a manufacturing process, which can be assessed with real data to react to changing demands, requirements or business conditions. The difference is that while a simulation is theoretical, a digital twin is specific and actual.

Horizontal and Vertical Systems
Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)
I was confused about what to study & at which university. Talking to EduSpiral helped clear my doubts.
Zen Yi, Graduated from Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)

When it comes to horizontal integration, Industry 4.0 envisions connected networks of cyber-physical and enterprise systems that introduce unprecedented levels of automation, flexibility, and operational efficiency into production processes. This horizontal integration takes place at several levels:

  • On the production floor: Always-connected machines and production units each become an object with well-defined properties within the production network. They constantly communicate their performance status and, together, respond autonomously to dynamic production requirements. The ultimate goal is that smart production floors will be able to cost-effectively produce lot sizes of one as well as reduce costly downtime through predictive maintenance.
  • Across multiple production facilities: If an enterprise has distributed production facilities, Industry 4.0 promotes horizontal integration across plant-level Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES). In this scenario, production facility data (inventory levels, unexpected delays, and so on) are shared seamlessly across the entire enterprise and, where possible, production tasks are shifted automatically among facilities in order to respond quickly and efficiently to production variables.
  • Across the entire supply chain: Industry 4.0 proposes data transparency and high levels of automated collaboration across the upstream supply and logistics chain that provisions the production processes themselves as well as the downstream chain that brings the finished products to market. Third-party suppliers and service providers must be securely but tightly incorporated horizontally into the enterprise’s production and logistics control systems.

Vertical integration in Industry 4.0 aims to tie together all logical layers within the organization from the field layer (i.e., the production floor) up through R&D, quality assurance, product management, IT, sales and marketing, and so on. Data flows freely and transparently up and down these layers so that both strategic and tactical decisions can be data-driven. The vertically integrated Industry 4.0 enterprise gains a crucial competitive edge by being able to respond appropriately and with agility to changing market signals and new opportunities.

Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a key component of smart factories. Machines on the factory floor are equipped with sensors that feature an IP address that allows the machines to connect with other web-enabled devices. This connectivity makes it possible for large amounts of valuable data to be collected, analyzed and exchanged.

Cybersecurity Technology

Manufacturing companies have not always considered the importance of cybersecurity. However, the same connectivity of operational equipment in the factory or field (OT) that enables more efficient manufacturing processes also exposes new entry paths for malicious attacks and malware. When undergoing a digital transformation to Industry 4.0, it is essential to consider a cybersecurity approach that encompasses IT and OT equipment.

The cost of a data breach in industrial manufacturing is among the highest of any industry. A single breach averages $5.2 million in the industrial sector, according to the 2019 Cost of a Data Breach Report by the Ponemon Institute. It can be much worse. When the WannaCry ransomware attack took place in May 2017, many manufacturing companies were hit particularly hard, with several automobile companies shutting down factories for days. Overall losses totaled in the billions of dollars.

Today, you have more open factory floors and supply chains. You must have granular visibility and controls, eliminating risks of unauthorized users, applications and data on the network. You also have to accept that nothing is perfect despite these controls, that threats can still get in.

You need provisions to quickly detect and prevent against attacks. For example, tools to automate threat detection and response, leveraging machine learning for IoT and Industry 4.0. The technologies that increase the attack surface are the same technologies that can automate cybersecurity detection and prevention. However, automation must be used strategically.

Cloud computing

Cloud computing is a cornerstone of any Industry 4.0 strategy. Full realization of smart manufacturing demands connectivity and integration of engineering, supply chain, production, sales and distribution, and service. Cloud helps make that possible. In addition, the typically large amount of data being stored and analyzed can be processed more efficiently and cost-effectively with cloud. Cloud computing can also reduce startup costs for small- and medium-sized manufacturers who can right-size their needs and scale as their business grows.

Additive manufacturing (AM)

Additive manufacturing (AM) or additive layer manufacturing (ALM) is the industrial production name for 3D printing, a computer controlled process that creates three dimensional objects by depositing materials, usually in layers.

Using computer aided design (CAD) or 3D object scanners, additive manufacturing allows for the creation of objects with precise geometric shapes. These are built layer by layer, as with a 3D printing process, which is in contrast to traditional manufacturing that often requires machining or other techniques to remove surplus material.

AM is used to create a wide range of products across a growing number of industries, including:

  • Aerospace
    AM is particularly suited to aerospace applications due to its weight saving capability and ability to produce complex geometric parts such as blisks.
  • Automotive
    A variety of materials are widely additive manufactured for the automotive industry as they can be rapidly prototyped while offering weight and cost reductions.
  • Medical
    The medical sector is finding an increasing number of applications for additively manufactured parts, especially for bespoke custom-fitted implants and devices.

AI and machine learning

AI and machine learning allow manufacturing companies to take full advantage of the volume of information generated not just on the factory floor, but across their business units, and even from partners and third-party sources. AI and machine learning can create insights providing visibility, predictability and automation of operations and business processes. For instance: Industrial machines are prone to breaking down during the production process. Using data collected from these assets can help businesses perform predictive maintenance based on machine learning algorithms, resulting in more uptime and higher efficiency.

Augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR)

Industry 4.0 is increasing in recent years and is one of the main sectors where Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality technologies are being adopted.

In the context of Industry 4.0, Innovae augmented reality and virtual reality allow to empower the workforce and train operators to be more efficient in increasingly complex production processes.

In short, these technologies allow operators to obtain critical knowledge easily and visually, enabling the performance of tasks more efficiently.

The applications of augmented reality in Industry 4.0. are several and are aimed at supporting technicians in their real working environment.

Through augmented reality, the user can visualize step-by-step procedures of the task to be performed or even get visual instructions in real time from experts with remote assistance systems.

Currently, the presence of augmented reality in areas such as maintenance, assembly processes or quality control is already common and reference companies in various sectors are implementing systems based on augmented reality to revolutionize their industrial processes.

Edge computing

The demands of real-time production operations mean that some data analysis must be done at the “edge”—that is, where the data is created. This minimizes latency time from when data is produced to when a response is required. For instance, the detection of a safety or quality issue may require near-real-time action with the equipment. The time needed to send data to the enterprise cloud and then back to the factory floor may be too lengthy and depends on the reliability of the network. Using edge computing also means that data stays near its source, reducing security risks.

Which Courses are the Best for a Future Career in the Era of Industry 4.0 in Malaysia?

The International Labor Organization has estimated that almost 300 million jobs are at risk due to the coronavirus pandemic. Of those that are lost, almost 40% will not come back. According to research by the University of Chicago, they will be replaced by automation to get work done more safely and efficiently. Particularly at risk are so-called “frontline” jobs – customer service, cashiers, retail assistant, and public transport being just a few examples. But no occupation or profession is entirely future proof. Thanks to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), even tasks previously reserved for highly trained doctors and lawyers – diagnosing illness from medical images, or reviewing legal case history, for example – can now be carried out by machines.

At the same time, the World Economic Forum, in its 2020 Future of Jobs report, finds that 94% of companies in the UK will accelerate the digitization of their operations as a result of the pandemic, and 91% are saying they will provide more flexibility around home or remote working.

The world of work is in constant change. Email, video conferencing, and cloud sharing are now the norm and millions of people now work in the gig economy, rather than on structured payrolls. But perhaps the greatest debate about the future of work is centered on automation, artificial intelligence, and robotics, and their potential effects on jobs.

BETWEEN 3.3 million and 6 million jobs are expected to be created in Malaysia by 2030, but with the new age of automation Industrial 4.0, preparation and training are fast becoming the critical factor as the new workforce would need new skills.

Furthermore, the ever-increasing cost of living in Malaysia is making it challenging for fresh graduates and working professionals to support their lifestyle. In light of that, it would be important for students to plan ahead what career that you want to enter into so that you can choose a course that has future job demand and high salary in Malaysia.

By having a view of emerging job trends, it is hoped that students would be inspired to draw up study plans and select career choices and pathways as early as schooling years up to university level that will ensure success in future careers and work environments.

Malaysia’s 50 Future Jobs that have High Demand

Written by EduSpiral Consultant Services. For more information contact 01111408838

The Covid-19 pandemic has had a major impact on employment in nearly every industry in Malaysia over the past few months. However, the future of work is still looking pretty bright for technology and technology-related jobs.

With the evolution of technology, the current job landscape in Malaysia has changed drastically. In many industries and countries, the current in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even 5 years ago. The rise of technology has led to a disruption in the way we work and live. The Digital Era has changed the way we work.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0), artificial intelligence (AI), innovation, automation, Internet of Things (IOT) and other technological advancement would impact all industries. The Industry 4.0 will change the kinds of jobs needed across all market sectors. Therefore, students must possess the right skills to value-add, creative, empathetic and interactive in a technology-driven job landscape.

As the digital economy grows, Malaysians must be prepared to choose jobs that will be in demand in the future as well as still exist. 75 million job roles are expected to disappear by 2022 according to the “Future of Jobs Report 2018” by the World Economic Forum,. Furthermore, another 133 million roles are expected to emerge.

In addition, Malaysia has a high unemployment rate among its graduates. Thus, it is vital for students to consider carefully in the early stages which courses that would lead to jobs that will be high in demand in future. Ask advise from knowledgeable and experienced counselorswho can assess you, advise you with evidence based information and guide you to the best course that suits you.

You might also be interested to read these:

For more information on how to choose the right course with high job demand, contact 01111408838

Please fill up the Form below and I will WhatsApp you and provide you with sound advise on how to choose the best private university or college in Malaysia to study at. If you do not give your mobile number or full name as in IC, your query will not be answered. Our knowledgeable & experienced counsellor will send you a message on WhatsApp & provide assistance from there.

The Future of Jobs

EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary. Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate from UCSI University
EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary.
Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate

The International Labor Organization has estimated that almost 300 million jobs are at risk due to the coronavirus pandemic. Of those that are lost, almost 40% will not come back. According to research by the University of Chicago, they will be replaced by automation to get work done more safely and efficiently. Particularly at risk are so-called “frontline” jobs – customer service, cashiers, retail assistant, and public transport being just a few examples. But no occupation or profession is entirely future proof. Thanks to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), even tasks previously reserved for highly trained doctors and lawyers – diagnosing illness from medical images, or reviewing legal case history, for example – can now be carried out by machines.

At the same time, the World Economic Forum, in its 2020 Future of Jobs report, finds that 94% of companies in the UK will accelerate the digitization of their operations as a result of the pandemic, and 91% are saying they will provide more flexibility around home or remote working.

The world of work is in constant change. Email, video conferencing, and cloud sharing are now the norm and millions of people now work in the gig economy, rather than on structured payrolls. But perhaps the greatest debate about the future of work is centered on automation, artificial intelligence, and robotics, and their potential effects on jobs.

In 2017, the McKinsey Global Institute found that about half the activities people are paid to do globally could potentially be automated using technologies that exist today. While very few occupations can be automated entirely, about 60 percent of all occupations have at least 30 percent of constituent activities that can be automated.

Importantly, many more jobs will be changed than lost. Less than 5 percent of occupations can be automated in full; rather, we are more likely to see significant changes to the mix of activities that make up a work day.

BETWEEN 3.3 million and 6 million jobs are expected to be created in Malaysia by 2030, but with the new age of automation Industrial 4.0, preparation and training are fast becoming the critical factor as the new workforce would need new skills.

Furthermore, the ever-increasing cost of living in Malaysia is making it challenging for fresh graduates and working professionals to support their lifestyle. In light of that, it would be important for students to plan ahead what career that you want to enter into so that you can choose a course that has future job demand and high salary in Malaysia.

Amid an age of automation, Malaysia’s jobs outlook is ultimately promising. But the future of work will also create new needs for skills and long-term learning in nearly every part of the workforce.

By having a view of emerging job trends, it is hoped that students would be inspired to draw up study plans and select career choices and pathways as early as schooling years up to university level that will ensure success in future careers and work environments. Success will come to those who prepare.

Top 50 Future Jobs with High Demand in Malaysia

Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)
I was confused about what to study & at which university. Talking to EduSpiral helped clear my doubts.
Zen Yi, Graduated from Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University (APU)

The Academy of Sciences Malaysia estimates that one million people are required by 2020 to be in the science and technology fields. This includes 500,000 in support and services comprising technicians, talent in the vocational field, science officers, nurses as well as information and communications technology (ICT) personnel; 470,000 implementers like engineers, doctors and architects as well as well as scientists, technologists and applied scientists; in addition to 30,000 in research.

Traditional white-collar jobs (medical, legal and financial) as well as digital or IT-related jobs, including content creators, data scientists and IT professionals will continue to stay in demand for the next decade.

I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course. Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course.
Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
  1. Programmer or Software Engineers
  2. Information Technology (IT) Specialists
  3. Data Scientists/ Data Analysts / Data Engineers
  4. Computer ScienceCybersecurity, Digital Forensics, Blockchain,
  5. Artificial Intelligence (Ai)
  6. Cloud Computing
  7. Mobile App Developers
  8. Database Administrators
  9. Network Administrators
  10. Financial Technology (Fintech) Specialists
  11. Internet of Things (IoT)
  12. Actuaries
  13. Accountants
  14. Financial Analysts
  15. Digital Marketing Managers/ Social Media Marketing Managers – Digital Content, SEO Specialists, SEM, etc
  16. Architects
  17. Engineers
  18. Electrical & Electronic Engineers  – Aerospace Engineers, Nanotecchnology Engineers, etc
  19. Telecommunication Engineers
  20. Mechatronics Engineers
  21. Mechanical Engineers
  22. Civil Engineers
  23. Chemical Engineers
  24. Petroleum Engineers
  25. Human Resource Managers
  26. Marketing Communications (MarComm) or Public Relations Managers
  27. Logistics & Supply Chain Managers
  28. Sales & Marketing
  29. eCommerce or e-Business
  30. Quantity Surveyors
  31. Animators
  32. Multimedia Designers
  33. Graphic Designers
  34. Computer Games Developers
  35. Film, TV, Video or Broadcasting
  36. Lawyers
  37. Hoteliers and Tourism Specialists
  38. Professional Chefs
  39. Events Managers
  40. Pharmacists
  41. Food Scientists
  42. Biotechnology
  43. Culinology
  44. Medical Lab Technologist (MLT)
  45. Medical Imaging
  46. Nurses
  47. Physiotherapists
  48. Dentists
  49. Medical Specialists
  50. Psychologists

What are the Jobs that are in High Demand in Malaysia for the Future?

EduSpiral helped me to understand clearly what software engineering is about & helped me to choose the right university. Vincent Chow, Software Engineering Graduate, Asia Pacific University
EduSpiral helped me to understand clearly what software engineering is about & helped me to choose the right university. Vincent Chow, Software Engineering Graduate, Asia Pacific University

Malaysia government’s focus was also in line with its efforts to meet the challenges of the Industrial Revolution 4.0 (IR 4.0) that requires highly skilled human capital. More new job opportunities would emerge as the digital revolution unfolded, and cited the World Economic Forum’s estimate that 65% of the workforce will work in the yet to be created job sector because it requires digital skills.

TalentCorp had listed 59 critical occupations that are hard to be filled. The Institute for Labour Market Information and Analysis (Ilmia) had recently told FMT that over the past four years, employers had found it increasingly difficult to fill positions. These included jobs as information communications and technology managers, mathematicians, actuaries and statisticians, machinery, equipment and advanced engineering professionals, and policy and planning managers.

Ilmia also said vacancies also existed for business services managers, research and development managers, and mechanical, electrical and electronic managers. Software developers, auditors, financial analysts and computer network professionals are also in short supply.

What are Malaysian Employers Looking for in Graduates

Employers are also looking at people with soft skills that cannot be replaced by technology. They want those with emotional intelligence and those who can solve complex problems.

Other than academic qualifications, employers are looking for five main qualities. These are

  1. creativity to connect the missing dots in their jobs
  2. emotional intelligence to deal with the work pressure
  3. judgement to analyse the large amounts of information
  4. mental agility to deal with multi-tasking
  5. good command of the English language & communication skills

High Unemployment Rate in Malaysian Graduates

I contacted EduSpiral to find an affordable college for culinary arts. He arranged for me and my mother for a campus tour & helped me find a college that had excellent facilities that I could afford. Fu Wei, Diploma in Culinary Arts Graduate from YTL International College of Hotel Management
I contacted EduSpiral to find an affordable college for culinary arts. He arranged for me and my mother for a campus tour & helped me find a college that had excellent facilities that I could afford.
Fu Wei, Diploma in Culinary Arts Graduate from YTL International College of Hotel Management

The unemployment rate among fresh graduates is expected to increase to 25% this year, 2020. In comparison to last year, it is a jump from 13.8%. The Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE) said 75,000 out of 300,000 fresh graduates are expected to be unemployed in 2020 due to the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Furthermore, 41,161 out of 330,557 graduates from 2019 are still unemployed. With the addition of 75,000 from 2020, the total unemployment among the group will add up to a whopping 116,161 people.

Last year, 189,543 out of 330,557 graduates managed to get a job six months after they graduated.

The youth unemployment in Malaysia is at 13.2%. The highest unemployment rate is seen among those aged 15 to 19, at 18.7%, followed by those aged 20 to 24, at 11.9%, according to the Economic Outlook Report 2019 issued by the finance ministry.

Data collected through the Ministry of Education Malaysia’s Graduate Tracer Study (SKPG) – Graduate Detection Survey System in 2018 found that nearly 60% of graduates who had completed their first degree and above were unemployed after one year of graduation. “The number of graduates who have not been employed after one year of graduation for the First Degree holders and above is 30,765 persons or 59.9% of the 51,365 graduates,”

Graduates being left behind, possess outdated information and lacking in relevant skills required by the industry, thus contributing to the rising unemployment rate. World Bank comparative youth unemployment puts Malaysia as the second highest to Indonesia in the region. With the hidden unemployment segments added in, Malaysian youth unemployment is probably more like 15-18 percent.

The prime reason for graduate youth unemployment is the mismatch of graduate qualifications with the country’s workforce needs. Of 1.47 million vacancies, 86.9 percent are for low skilled jobs. Only 4.7 percent of those advertised required any tertiary qualifications. Graduate unemployment was 9.6 percent or 204,000 at the end of 2018.

The youth unemployment rate in Malaysia, at 10.9 percent officially, is more than triple the national rate of 3.3 percent and has been gradually rising over the past decade. Unemployed youth make up almost 60 percent of the 504,000 currently unemployed.

The Ministry of Education decides what courses universities offer rather than market forces. This is where the mismatches are coming from. Malaysian universities are currently overcapacity and producing too many graduates to what can be generally absorbed into domestic Malaysian workforce.

A Job Street survey found the 58 percent are choosy about what job they do or company they work for, 58 percent are considered of poor character, attitude or personality, 52 percent have a poor command of English, 49 percent have poor communication skills, and 66 percent have unrealistic salary expectations.

In light of the high graduate unemployment rate, Malaysian secondary school students need to do their research or ask knowledgeable and experienced counselors who would know what the future job demand is like for their courses of interest. Then, you are able to make the right choice and not end up unemployed like the rest.

Good Command of the English Language Increases Your Employability

EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university. Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university.
Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

In a research, commissioned by the Ministry of Women and Family and Community Development, it was found that there was very little variation in CGPA between employed and unemployed graduates. This explains why the overall academic performance did not affect the chance of becoming employed graduates. On the other hand, graduates who had higher English proficiencies were employed compared to unemployed graduates.

The study showed that having good grades did not guarantee employment for Malaysian graduates. The
graduates must have a good command of English and other soft skills such as analytical thinking, intelligence, independence, leadership, communication and computer skills and work experience.

The results showed that the chance of being employed rose with an increase in English proficiency. The only significant personality variable is leadership and technical skills and this variable consisted of constructs such as possessing analytical thinking, being intelligent, independent, having leadership skills, communication and computer skills and possessing work experience.

Most of these challenges are more pronounced for graduates who come from rural areas because they
are less exposed to speaking in English and almost all of them study in the public universities where Bahasa Malaysia is used as the medium of instruction.

In another study by the Ministry of Higher Education on the National Graduate Employability, Prospective employers complain of fresh Institution of Higher Learning (IHL) graduates lacking the  prerequisite attributes; more than 50% of fresh graduates are deemed to be unsatisfactory in English  communication skills, and yet, many of these young, inexperienced job-seekers expect unrealistically high starting salaries.

Currently, deficiencies are seen in the areas of communication, ICT knowledge, and professional and technical skills which have resulted in an insufficient supply of employable graduates. This situation is further aggravated by university students not pursuing fields of study that are relevant to industry

“Every year about 180,000 students graduate with diplomas and degrees from institutions of higher learning.

The most common problems identified by employers are poor command of English (55.8%), poor character, attitude or personality (37.4%), asking for unrealistic salary/benefits (33%), mismatch of skills (30.2%), choosy in job/company (27.7%), no demonstrated ability to solve problems (25.9%) and skill knowledge not indepth enough (23.8%). As the main demand of industry is to employ graduates who are GSA (Generic Student Attribute) centred, from the graph above it is obvious that these skills are lacking among fresh graduates.

Malaysian industries are currently emphasising a set of skills that the graduates should have when they apply for a job, which are divided into two separate categories comprising hard skills and soft skills. Hard skills are defined as the mastery and practice of a body of knowledge whereas soft skills are the development of largely inter- and intra-personal skills.

There are several hard skills and soft skills that have been highlighted, which should be incorporated into the IHL curriculum to increase the graduate employability and employment rate. Some hard skills include
provision of temporary/vacation work, literacy, time management, research skills, computer skills, help to secure work placement and internship, contacts with employers, CV writing, providing help in job search, career fairs, and job searching techniques.

Correspondingly, some of the soft skills are team working skills, presentation skills, decision making skills,
communication skills, understanding of career area, interview practice, and career identification and planning.

Important to Choose the Right Course so that You Will Not Be Unemployed after Graduation

I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream. Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor's University
I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream.
Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor’s University

Choosing the right course to study after SPM or O-Levels is just the first step in the right direction of achieving a life with stable or high income. Some students have known what they wanted to be since they were young while others are no sure, even after completing their SPM & O-Levels.

Furthermore, one of the main aims of getting a university education in Malaysia is to find a stable job so that you can take care of yourself and your family. However, nowadays, with the high cost of living, just finding any job will not do. You will need to find a job that has a high salary.

With the high youth unemployment rate in Malaysia, it is important to choose your course wisely. If you don’t plan carefully, you may end up studying a course that has no job demand after you graduate. This would be an incredible waste of your time and money.

To find out more on how to choose the right course, click on this link.

How to Prepare Yourself During University to Make Sure that You are not Jobless When You Graduate

I had taken a course and wasn't doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well. Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College
I had taken a course and wasn’t doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well.
Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College

The best time to start on your future career is now. If you wait until after graduation, it will be too late as you won’t have time. After work, you will be tired and have other personal activities as well. It will take a lot of discipline to balance your work life. Therefore, the best time is to prepare yourself while you are at university. Here are some tips:

  • Join clubs and societies
  • Participate in on-campus activities like going for talks, events, trips, etc.
  • Mix around with the international students on campus and learn about their culture. It is great for networking and future opportunities
  • Learn how to communicate, lead, and how to work in a team.
  • Learn how to organise events and manage your time.
  • Immerse yourself in internships; be seen and heard in your team. It is important for Malaysian university students to get the right type of internships so that they were employable after their graduation.
  • Use online time to update yourself with news, training, new tech, concepts and trends. Educational and visionary YouTube or podcasts inspire intelligent questions and will prepare you for interviews with future employers and engagement with colleagues.

Top 40 Courses with Future High Job Demand in Malaysia

Best Courses to Study in Malaysia that has Great Career Prospects

Written by EduSpiral Consultant Services For more information contact 01111408838

The world is changing at a fast pace and unpredictable, but what remains constant is that you still need to find a job when you graduate. Marked by continuous digital transformation, re-industrialisation and regulatory changes, Malaysia’s job market is geared for significant changes in the future. With
innovation driving the world of work ever faster,  graduates are now requiring new skills in technology, communication, problem-solving and leadership in order to remain competitive.

As the digital economy grows, Malaysia must be prepared to choose jobs that will be in demand in the future as well as still exist. 75 million job roles are expected to disappear by 2022 according to the “Future of Jobs Report 2018” by the World Economic Forum,. Furthermore, another 133 million roles are expected to emerge

You might be left wondering after SPM or IGCSE O-Levels: How can I find a job that fits me? Which courses will lead to jobs with high demand in the future?
We know that finding that dream job starts with choosing the right course now. Our role is to help you navigate those challenges, and connect you with information that will help you reach your full potential.

At EduSpiral Consultant Services, we do our research on the job demand for the careers in Malaysia and Salary Reports in order to best advise our students on what to study based on facts and evidence. Students need to talk to the right education counsellors so that you get the right information to help you in making this life-changing decision. We have prepare a list of the best courses to study in Malaysia that has high job demand to help students choose the right career for a successful future.

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Look at Job Demand and Trends in Malaysia when Choosing your Course

EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university. Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
EduSpiral gave me useful information & evidence on why I should choose the best university.
Philip Sim, Information Technology (IT) graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

Global markets are being disrupted by an accelerating pace of innovation in the digital world. Digital transformation has entered an era of unprecedented change for enterprises necessitating a fundamental shift across processes, functions, customer engagement and many other aspects of business.

Today, more than ever before, it has become imperative for organizations to implement concrete strategies around digital transformation.

Organisations & companies in Malaysia are already reinventing themselves to embrace digitalization, so it comes as no surprise that this field is observing – now and in the future – a steady and strong demand.

Digitalization will permeate into all areas of our work and students must prepare themselves now by choosing the right course as well as acquire the necessary computing skills to complement their “non-computing” degree.

One of the biggest talent trends observed for the coming year is the impact of digitalisation on traditional job roles across industries and functions. Apart from a high demand for digital professionals in the areas of data analytics, cyber security and IT regulations, professionals in HR and marketing will also be increasingly expected to have digital knowledge and skillsets.

Automation will also impact functions across industries, particularly within HR, supply chain and finance sectors. Positions that involve high levels of simple repetition, such as finance data entry roles are at high risk of becoming redundant, while in HR and supply chain, knowledge of relevant software has also become vital.

Top 40 Courses with High Job Demand in Future

I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course. Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
I was not sure of what to study. EduSpiral helped me to choose the right course.
Jasmine, Business Information Systems Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

  1. Data Science
  2. Cyber Security
  3. Software Engineering
  4. Computer Science
  5. Artificial Intelligence (Ai)
  6. Financial Technology (Fintech)
  7. Blockchain
  8. Internet of Things (IoT)
  9. Network Computing
  10. Cloud Computing
  11. Information Systems
  12. Mobile Computing
  13. Accounting & Finance
  14. Actuarial Science
  15. Banking & Finance
  16. Human Resource Management (HRM)
  17. International Business Management (IBM)
  18. Logistics & Supply Chain
  19. eBusiness or eCommerce
  20. Digital Marketing
  21. Marketing
  22. Mass Communication
  23. Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  24. Telecommunication Engineering
  25. Optical Engineering
  26. Nanotechnology
  27. Mechatronic Engineering
  28. Mechanical Engineering
  29. Chemical Engineering
  30. Architecture
  31. Civil Engineering
  32. Quantity Survey (QS)
  33. Construction Management
  34. Digital Animation & Visual Effects
  35. Game Design
  36. Virtual Reality (VR)/Augmented Reality (AR)
  37. Interior Design
  38. Hotel Management
  39. Culinary Arts
  40. Event Management

Prepare for Future Career Success by Choosing the Right Course Now

"I met up with EduSpiral about 4 times in Ipoh & at Asia Pacific University to discuss about my future. He provided me with in-depth information and even arranged for me to meet up with the Head of School at APU to talk to me." Kar Jun (Left), Accounting graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
“I met up with EduSpiral about 4 times in Ipoh & at Asia Pacific University to discuss about my future. He provided me with in-depth information and even arranged for me to meet up with the Head of School at APU to talk to me.”
Kar Jun (Left), Accounting graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

Graduate employability has also become a concern  for Malaysia. Employers recognise the concerns  on graduate’s skills gap, such as the lack of  industrial training experience and communication skills.

In order to be successful in your future career, students need to study the employment trends to see which jobs and skills would be in demand. You don’t want to graduate and find yourself jobless because what you have learnt is not relevant anymore.

Graduate unemployment in Malaysia was approximately 204,000 in 2017, making up 40.5 percent of total unemployment. In the past, bodies such as Malaysian Industrial Development Finance (MIDF) Research, a statutory body under the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, observed that Malaysia’s high youth unemployment rate – which hit a record 13.2 percent in 2018 – was likely due to skills mismatch.

As the country’s central bank noted in its 2018 annual report released in March, there are more graduates in the country than there are jobs for them.

List of Courses with High Job Demand in Malaysia

I didn't know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what's in demand for the future. Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia
I didn’t know what to study after A-Levels. EduSpiral helped me to understand what I am good at as well as what’s in demand for the future.
Renee Tan, Mechanical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia

The list of top courses with high job demand in future is to give students an idea of what courses they should consider so that they can have a successful career. The courses that have future high job demand can be grouped into the following job categories:

  • Computing
    • Digital or IT-related jobs, including content creators, data scientists and IT professionals will continue to stay in demand for the next decade.
    • The World Economic Forum (WEF) in its Future of Jobs report, characterises Industry 4.0 as the developments of genetics, artificial intelligence, networked devices, robotics, nanotechnology, 3D printing and other smart technologies.
    • In Malaysia, IT spending in 2018 is forecast to rise 5.7% to RM65.2 billion, faster than the projected global pace of 4.5%. The increased spending will be focus on adopting business digitalisation, blockchain technology and big data to encourage learning and artificial intelligence.
  • Banking & Financial Services

    EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary. Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate from UCSI University
    EduSpiral advised me to study Finance because it had high job demand & salary.
    Darren, Finance & Investment Graduate from UCSI University

    • Skilled finance, banking & investment professionals are projected to remain in high demand in Malaysia’s accountancy & finance job market as employers grow their businesses and add more value for clients. Strong demand exists for qualified graduates in finance, banking & investment possessing critical thinking skills, innovative, interpersonal communication skills and a strong command of the English language.
    • Although Malaysia’s finance sector is growing steadily the supply of talent has begun to decrease. That’s not good news especially now that Malaysia needs more finance talents in preparation for the Tun Razak Exchange (TRX) which is set to bolster the country’s economic landscape.
    • TRX, Malaysia’s version of Wall Street, will bring together local and overseas financial institutions and other corporations in a single area. The country is said to require 40,000 qualified financial talents by 2020 yet about 56,000 new finance industry jobs will be available in the next 10 years.  That’s not nearly enough.
    • By 2020, the Malaysian financial services sector is predicted to create 275,400 new jobs, with positions relating to accountsinvestments, international trade, sales and marketing and economics becoming widely available.
  • Business

    I am so glad that my mother found EduSpiral online. I used to be quiet and not able to communicate well in English. Now, I am more confident and speak a lot in English because of the great university environment. Zhi Kang, Business Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)
    I am so glad that my mother found EduSpiral online. I used to be quiet and not able to communicate well in English. Now, I am more confident and speak a lot in English because of the great university environment.
    Zhi Kang, Business Graduate from Asia Pacific University (APU)

    • HR leaders, therefore, have a significant impact on the businesses in which they operate. From payroll, benefits and training, to implementing talent attraction and retention strategies, the HR function is critical to ensuring that a company’s workforce is at its tip top condition to perform effectively and productively.
    • HR professionals whose expertise lie in learning and development, talent management, change management and transformation are an extremely sought-after breed, and especially so if such talent possess digital adoption or digital project management experience to boot. The heightened need for greater tech-savvy HR professionals is accelerated by initiatives such as the Malaysian government’s announcement to pump US$720 million into its “Industry Digitalization Transformation Fund”, in its endeavours to enhance its digital economy. A significant US$50 million of which would be used to help small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in their transition to Industry 4.0.’
    • Aptly observed in a Deloitte report, “HR has a critical opportunity to help lead the transformation to a digital enterprise. In the next several years, HR teams that embrace digital platforms to take up the dual challenge of transforming HR operations on the one hand, and transforming the workforce and the way work is done on the other, will be game changers. HR leaders who “lean into” new technologies, platforms, and ways of working… will be strongly positioned to have an impact on business results and employee experience.” The importance of the HR function to digitalise the modus operandi of businesses has never been more indisputable.
    • Another factor driving HR talent demand in Malaysia is the setup of regional HR Shared Service Centres (SSCs) in the country. Candidates who have specific experience in this area are therefore highly sought after. This trend will continue to grow due to the language capabilities of Malaysian talent, which makes the country an ideal location for MNCs to operate SSCs.
  • Logistics & Supply Chain

    I had so many questions to ask and being in Sitiawan made it difficult to find out about the universities. I WhatsApped Eduspiral & he helped me to find the right university. Met me & my family to take us around & also register. Kuan Jian, Diploma in Logistics, UCSI University
    I had so many questions to ask and being in Sitiawan made it difficult to find out about the universities. I WhatsApped Eduspiral & he helped me to find the right university. Met me & my family to take us around & also register.
    Kuan Jian, Diploma in Logistics, UCSI University

    • As supply chains today are being revolutionised by emerging technologies, this has resulted in new growth areas such as e-commerce and last mile delivery markets. Hence, in tandem with this growth, the logistics industry
      has also been expanding rapidly in the country, especially in the Klang Valley area.
    • It has grown at a rapid rate and contributed 3.5 per cent to Malaysia’s gross domestic products in 2017 with a value of RM48.8 billion, adding 6.6 per cent to the services sector. The sector is expected to grow further at a rate of 8.9 per cent or higher in the future.
    • The NLTF together with the Human Resources Ministry and the Economic Planning Unit had conducted the Study of Manpower in the Malaysian Logistics Sub Sector 2017. The study had projected that the Malaysian logistics industry required an increase of 41 per cent workers from 393,000 in 2016 to 554,000 workers by 2022. Jobs will be created in the fast growing e-commerce sector especially at the Digital Free Trade Zone and the e-fulfilment centres. For high skilled workers, there will be an increase of 40 per cent from 60,800 workers to 85,000 workers in 2022. Similarly, the demand for semi skilled workers also increases by 40 per cent from 180,000 to 252,000. We need workers with expertise in the field of supply chain network design, integrated warehouse management, information technology application and sophisticated crane operations.
  • Marketing & Communications

    I was confused about what to study & concerned about Mass Comm. EduSpiral answered my questions with facts to show that mass comm is in demand in Malaysia. Jacob Lean, Graduated with Mass Communication from KDU University College
    I was confused about what to study & concerned about Mass Comm. EduSpiral answered my questions with facts to show that mass comm is in demand in Malaysia.
    Jacob Lean, Graduated with Mass Communication from KDU University College

    • Marketing & Communications professionals are the backbone of the companies in promoting the products & services and bringing in the profits. Without them, there won’t be any money coming in.
    • Malaysian employers are eager to hire professionals who can contribute to their customer experience and digital marketing initiatives. The need for talent with top skills in the digital and traditional marketing space continues to be driven by technology. The evolution of skills changes from one year to the next, but it is the way that businesses utilise these skills to drive their talent and overall business forward that matters the most. Professionals with skill sets in specific areas of marketing, and the knowledge to give advice and insights on how to develop areas such as SEO, PPC, and CRM, will be in high demand in 2020.
    • Southeast Asian companies have been on the hunt for marketing talent, with Malaysia witnessing a 14% annual growth from 56 in 2018 to 64 in 2019. This was an improvement from the month of February, which saw a 9% year-on-year (yoy) dip in the demand for advertising and marketing talent in Malaysia. The data is according to the Monster Employment Index (MEI) which is a monthly gauge of online hiring activity across Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines tracked by Monster.com
  • Engineering

    I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream. Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor's University
    I loved motorsports and EduSpiral gave me great advise to help guide me to achieve my dream.
    Justin Moo, Mechanical Engineering graduate from Taylor’s University

    • With major infrastructure developments underway, Malaysia’s engineering excellence and talent prospects are heading towards exciting times. With 200,000 engineers needed by 2020 to pursue developed nation status, this will mean tripling nearly 70,000 registered engineers of the talent pool.
    • The engineer to population ratio for developed nations is 1:100. For Malaysia, with a population of 32 million, the number of engineers should be 300,000.  As of February 2020, BEM’s registered Graduate Engineers and Professional Engineers stand at 137,073
    • Currently, according to Board of Engineers Malaysia (BEM) there are 11010 Professional Engineers and 81771 Graduate Engineers in Malaysia. Malaysia needs around 275,000 and 300,000 engineers in 5 and 10 years respectively.
    • Unveiled in late 2018, the National Policy on Industry 4.0, or Industry4WRD, will support the Engineering sector’s efforts to ramp up reliance on technology, and less on capital and manpower, to increase productivity – with the overall objective of transforming Malaysia into a
      strategic partner for smart manufacturing and high-tech industries.
    • Recognising the need for a future-ready and highly skilled engineering workforce to support this growth, the government intends to nearly double the number of skilled workers from 18% to 35% by 2025.
    • Plans have also been outlined for deeper investment in technical and vocational training as well as diploma and degree courses for students in engineering. Further, the development of a world class aerospace hub in Subang by Khazanah will lead to greater demand for highly skilled
      workers to meet the demands of the aerospace industry. As such, engineering talents that possess both technical knowledge and soft skills will continue to be sought after by employers across different industries
  • Construction
    • Malaysia’s construction industry is one of the fastest-moving sectors and with major projects going on around the nation, the industry is not forecasted to slow down anytime soon. The construction industry is expected to grow by 8.3% in 2017 making the industry worth a whopping RM170bn. Demand for construction professionals are higher than ever with Malaysia currently facing a shortage of supply of these professionals.
  • Creative Media

    I had taken a course and wasn't doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well. Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College
    I had taken a course and wasn’t doing well. Then, I met EduSpiral who guided me to the right course and now I am doing very well.
    Brendon, Entertainment Arts graduate from KDU University College

    • According to a report by World Bank Group’s Global Knowledge and Research Hub in Malaysia, the local creative content industry raked in revenue of RM7.9 billion from 2013 to 2017 while the animation sector for export reached RM132 million. Comparatively, the Asian animation industry was valued at US$52 billion in 2017 with most segments growing at up to 3% year on year. The report said there are more than 372 studios in Malaysia that are directly involved in various stages of development and production and are creating 11,150 jobs.
    • For Malaysia, there are plenty of locally made games and animated shows that have taken off to become global icons. This includes Thor: War of Tapnorok, Bake ‘n Switch, WarPods, King’s League II, BoiBoiBoy, Ejen Ali, Chuck Chicken and so many more.
    • The Malaysian animation industry was worth RM567.86 million ($187.7 million) and employed over 3,000 people in 2016, according to the Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation (MDEC) — the government-sponsored agency central to the nation’s digital content success. The total digital content industry in Malaysia now stands at RM 7 billion ($1.68 billion) with exports doubling since 2014 to RM 1 billion ($2.4 million). It reports there are now over 100 homegrown studios that have produced more than 65 original IPs and seen their work travel to 120+ countries, with an export value of RM170 million (over $32.2 million).
    • On the eGames sphere, the lead government agency in technology, MDEC, in its South-East Asia Game Industry Initiative report, said Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam had game companies that were able to generate between US$5mil and US$10mil revenue per year.
    • Meanwhile, the Communications and Multimedia Ministry has partnered with Sony Interactive Entertainment Worldwide Studios (SIE WWS) to establish the global games powerhouse’s very first South-East Asia studio in Malaysia next year. The partnership was a strong recognition of Malaysia as the heart of the games industry in this region. Sony Interactive Entertainment Worldwide Studios Malaysia Sdn Bhd (SIE WWS Malaysia) will provide art and animation services as part of the SIE WWS activities, developing global exclusive titles for PlayStation platforms.
    • The MSC Malaysia Annual and Quarterly Industry Report reported that games exports grew by a compound annual growth rate of 118% to RM681mil between 2014 and 2018. The domestic landscape features 53 game studios, many of which are developing local games and creating intellectual properties while also nurturing talent for both local and international projects.
  • Hospitality & Tourism

    I didn't know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose. Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism
    I didn’t know which college fit me, so, EduSpiral took me to visit 4 universities to help me choose.
    Erwin, Graduated from Diploma in Hospitality & Tourism

    • A total of 330 million jobs are supported by the hospitality & tourism industry around the world, contributing 10 per cent, or US$8.9 trillion, to the global gross domestic product each year. Although the Covid-19 Pandemic has hit the hospitality & tourism industry badly, however, once it is over people will want to travel again and demand for hospitality & tourism professionals will once again rise in the next few years which means there would be jobs when you graduate.
    • Malaysia’s hospitality and tourism industry has great potential to boost further, following the abundance of natural resources, well-diversified cultural and cuisines, modern infrastructure, and strategic location, added by the intensified efforts to improve safety and security in the country, including measures to curb intrusion and other threats.